Day: June 27, 2020

The CDC Added 3 More COVID-19 Symptoms To Its Official List

As the number of new COVID-19 cases increase, so does the the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) list of coronavirus symptoms.

The CDC recently added three more symptoms on its “Symptoms of Coronavirus” list, bringing the total number of possible symptoms to 12. The newly added symptoms (though, not necessarily “new” symptoms as they’ve been pointed out since the beginning of the pandemic) are congestion or runny nose, nausea, and diarrhea. The last time the CDC updated its list was in late April, with the addition of chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, and new loss of taste or smell.

Now, the list of possible symptoms includes: fever, chills, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, and diarrhea.

“People with COVID-19 have had

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7 ways cybercrime is evolving amid the coronavirus pandemic

For many cybercriminals, the global coronavirus pandemic has been a golden opportunity for fraud.

And we haven’t even seen the worst of it yet.

Scammers love crises. From the criminal’s perspective, few things are better for cultivating new victims than a natural disaster or a social crisis.

Why? Because scams work best when people aren’t thinking clearly. When people are highly emotional, scared or anxious, as they usually are during a crisis, they tend to make impulsive decisions. This is exactly what the scammers want.

Read more: What to do if your identity has been stolen

A woman uses a smartphone and a mobilephone in front of a laptop on April 3, 2019. (Photo by ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP via Getty Images)

Cybercriminals are opportunists, and during a “normal” crisis — like a natural disaster — the opportunities are often short-lived. But the current crisis (or, rather, crises) is different.

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5 Reasons to Get an HIV Test Today

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Everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 should be tested for HIV at least once in their lifetime, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Despite the CDC’s sweeping recommendation, fewer than 40 percent of adults in the U.S. have ever gotten an HIV test, according to a study published last year. And even though HIV testing is becoming more common in emergency rooms and community health centers, there has been no increase in testing at doctors’ offices, the CDC reported in a June 26 study. 

In the midst of the COVID-19 crisis, HIV may not be top of mind. But “HIV and sexual health services are always needed,” says Omi Singh, M.P.H., the director of testing at GMHC, an HIV care and advocacy nonprofit. “The current pandemic has not stopped that.”

HIV, the virus

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White Evangelicals Aren’t As Worried About COVID-19 As Other Faith Groups: Study

White evangelicals’ attitudes toward the coronavirus pandemic are considerably more relaxed than those of other religious groups, a new study said.

White evangelical Protestants were generally less worried about contracting COVID-19, more ready for life to return to normal and much more likely to say that President Donald Trump was handling the pandemic well, compared to Americans from other faith groups.

The results are part of an analysis prepared for HuffPost by the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative-leaning think tank, based on its “COVID-19 and American Life Survey.” That wide-ranging survey was conducted between May 21 and June 5, a period when daily confirmed new cases of the virus inched downwards in the U.S. 

The virus’s trajectory has recently shifted, with health officials expressing alarm Friday about a surge in new cases across the South and West. 

Daniel Cox, an AEI research fellow who authored the report, told HuffPost he

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Miami leaders have a few models for reopening schools. It’s up to parents to decide.

Miami-Dade County Public Schools’ plans keep shifting as coronavirus cases continue to spike exponentially.

The school district was due to announce its plan to reopen schools for the 2020-21 school year on Wednesday but postponed to squeeze in one more meeting with its work group of medical professionals and community members. The full plan will be presented at a special School Board meeting Wednesday, July 1.

“After the last Zoom call, as a parent, grandparent, I was extremely nervous and upset,” said Eileen Segal of the Family & Community Involvement Advisory Committee on Wednesday. “After listening today I feel a lot calmer.”

On Friday, the 23-member work group met virtually again to go over a revised draft plan. Seven models of how instruction would take place were whittled to four: A daily attendance at the schoolhouse model with reduced class sizes and social distancing; two hybrid models of in-person and

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Inside One Mother’s Fight To Help Her Kids Get An Education During Coronavirus

(Photo: Illustration: Damon Dahlen/HuffPost; Photos: Terri Johnson/Getty)
(Photo: Illustration: Damon Dahlen/HuffPost; Photos: Terri Johnson/Getty)

This story about rural education was produced as part of the series Critical Condition: The Students the Pandemic Hit Hardest, reported by HuffPost and The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education.

Terri Johnson willed her body not to show signs of impatience. She had been sitting in the parking lot of a McDonald’s in Greenville, Mississippi, for more than an hour, so her oldest child, Kentiona, could connect to the building’s Wi-Fi, something they didn’t have at home. Johnson didn’t want her daughter to feel rushed. 

Kentiona, 16, was in the passenger seat using the car’s dashboard as a makeshift desk. Her high school had recently closed in response to the coronavirus pandemic and shifted to distance learning. Kentiona’s persuasive essay for her English class had brought them to the McDonald’s on that third Friday

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Where 23 states stand on NFL, coronavirus measures

It’s that time of year when NFL teams should be heading into their final month of operations before wrapping the offseason with a full squad veteran minicamp in mid-June. Instead, the league’s power brokers are still trying to figure out when franchises across the country will be allowed to resume their operations — and if there is any hope of training camps or the regular season starting on time.

Murphy said on Tuesday that professional sports may resume practices and actual games in the state as soon as leagues allow teams to do so. On Wednesday, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf announced that his state will allow practices and games without spectators as long as the leagues have a safety plan approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Health once the state enters the “yellow” and “green” phases.

Newsom took a strong lockdown approach in early March to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. … Read More

Why AI is the next way patients will choose their doctors

Covid-19 has changed the course of healthcare for the foreseeable future. Healthcare workers, doctors’ rooms, and equipment inventories were stretched thin even before the pandemic took hold, with patients waiting weeks or months to get a doctor’s appointment or book a surgery. Today, these resources are nearing the breaking point.

With physicians’ offices and testing facilities closed for in-person appointments, and elective surgeries put on hold, it has become incredibly complicated for patients to find the care they need for pre-existing or non-Covid-19 health issues. They might not be able to see their usual doctor or maybe they’re simply trying to find a provider for the first time. In these instances, patients need as much guidance and insight as they can get in order to achieve their desired outcome, particularly in less than optimal conditions. But traditional resources, such as web reviews, personal recommendations, and media directories, are imperfect solutions.

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Miami officials have a few models for reopening schools. It’s up to parents to decide.

Miami-Dade County Public Schools’ plans keep shifting as coronavirus cases continue to spike exponentially.

The school district was due to announce its plan to reopen schools for the 2020-21 school year on Wednesday but postponed to squeeze in one more meeting with its work group of medical professionals and community members. The full plan will be presented at a special School Board meeting Wednesday, July 1.

“After the last Zoom call, as a parent, grandparent, I was extremely nervous and upset,” said Eileen Segal of the Family & Community Involvement Advisory Committee on Wednesday. “After listening today I feel a lot calmer.”

On Friday, the 23-member work group met virtually again to go over a revised draft plan. Seven models of how instruction would take place were whittled to four: A daily attendance at the schoolhouse model with reduced class sizes and social distancing; two hybrid models of in-person and

Read More

Edited Transcript of GRUPOSURA.BG earnings conference call or presentation 18-May-20 1:30pm GMT

Medellin Jun 27, 2020 (Thomson StreetEvents) — Edited Transcript of Grupo de Inversiones Suramericana SA earnings conference call or presentation Monday, May 18, 2020 at 1:30:00pm GMT

Sura Asset Management S.A. de C.V. – VP of Corporate Finance

Grupo de Inversiones Suramericana S.A. – CEO

Grupo de Inversiones Suramericana S.A. – Manager of IR

Grupo de Inversiones Suramericana S.A. – Chief Legal Corporate Affairs Officer & Secretary General

Grupo de Inversiones Suramericana S.A. – CFO & Chief Corporate Finance Officer

Corredores Davivienda S.A., Research Division – Equity Research Leader & Senior Equity Analyst

Welcome to the presentation of results of the first quarter of 2020 at Grupo SURA. My name is Sylvia, and I’ll be your operator for today’s call. (Operator Instructions) Please keep in mind that this teleconference is being taped.

As of now, we give the floor to Juan Carlos Gómez, General Manager of Investor Relations.

Juan Carlos … Read More