Day: June 28, 2020

Unemployed because of coronavirus? How to make money from home right away

If you know your way around a sewing machine, can quick-fix a washer/dryer, fridge, boat or car, have an eye for antiques or possess some other random – even quirky – expertise, you could make tens of thousands of dollars working from home within the next month or two. True story. 

Unemployment rates are at the highest peak in decades, and 1 of 6 people in America are out of work. Families are trying to figure out how to survive the pandemic and look for a new job. Here’s something very few of the newly unemployed realize: There’s work out there. A lot of it. And it might be just a few clicks away. 

Shopping reinvented: America’s stores, malls reopen with masks, curbside pickup and closed fitting rooms

Wearables as first line of defense? Tests expand on whether Fitbit, Apple Watch could predict coronavirus

In-demand experts earn as much as

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local health officials say they have been left in the dark on spread of coronavirus

PA
PA

The government’s new lighthouse laboratories were designed to be able to centralise data on the frontline of the fight against coronavirus – but multiple public health directors say they are still being denied postcode-level and specific patient data for positive tests.

Speaking to The Independent as part of our investigation into the UK’s coronavirus expansion, several said they had been informed about clusters of outbreaks by local media rather than via the NHS test and trace service because key details such as where a person works, or their place of worship, were not routinely recorded.

Summary level information from testing carried out by the Lighthouse Labs, pillar two of the government’s testing strategy, was not made available until earlier this month and provides only aggregate totals.

Public health officials said they had been “encouraged” not to publicly criticise the Lighthouse Labs or NHS Test and Trace, which launched at

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How to watch, start time, odds, team news

Watford – Southampton is the sole Premier League game on Sunday (start time, 11:30 a.m. ET on NBCSN and online via NBCSports.com) as the Hornets are in a relegation scrap and the Saints hope for a top 10 finish.

Watford’s relegation problems have been further hampered by Andre Gray, Nathaniel Chalobah, and Domingos Quina attending a reported 20-person party at Gray’s house. The club simply stated the players were omitted for “the health concerns” of players, staff, and officials.

Nigel Pearson’s side will see this as a very winnable game as they sit outside the relegation zone by just one point and have drawn with Leicester and lost at Burnley since the restart. Saints lost 2-0 against Arsenal last time out after Ralph Hasenhuttl’s side hammered Norwich in the first game of the restart.

WATFORD – SOUTHAMPTON STREAM LIVE

This clash will see Southampton’s high-pressing come up against the sturdy

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First local lockdown could be enforced in Leicester ‘within days’ after surge in cases

Coronavirus Article Bar with counter ..
Coronavirus Article Bar with counter ..

The Government is considering imposing the first local lockdown “within days” following a surge in Covid-19 cases in Leicester, the Home Secretary has confirmed.

The Health Secretary Matt Hancock is reportedly examining the legislation required for the shutdown after it was revealed that there have been 658 cases of the coronavirus in the Leicester area in the fortnight to June 16.

Speaking on the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show, Priti Patel said it was “correct” that the Government was considering the move.

In other news, global Covid-19 cases have exceeded 10 million today according to a tally by Reuters, marking a major milestone in the spread of the virus that has so far killed almost half a million people in seven months.

Coronavirus podcast newest episode
Coronavirus podcast newest episode

Follow the latest updates below.

04:22 PM

Analysis: Why Brexit and Covid-19 are set to collide

In case you

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Experts see no proof of child-abuse surge amid pandemic

NEW YORK (AP) — When the coronavirus pandemic took hold across the United States in mid-March, forcing schools to close and many children to be locked down in households buffeted by job losses and other forms of stress, many child-welfare experts warned of a likely surge of child abuse.

Fifteen weeks later, the worries persist. Yet some experts on the front lines, including pediatricians who helped sound the alarm, say they have seen no evidence of a marked increase.

Among them is Dr. Lori Frasier, who heads the child-protection program at Penn State’s Hershey Medical Center and is president of a national society of pediatricians specializing in child abuse prevention and treatment.

Frasier said she got input in recent days from 18 of her colleagues across the country and “no one has experienced the surge of abuse they were expecting.”

A similar assessment came from Jerry Milner, who communicates with

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Make Masks Accessories, Not Annoyances

(Bloomberg Opinion) — Why all the fuss about masks? Why won’t people just wear them?

“Masking has become controversial. It shouldn’t be,” former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said on “Face the Nation.” To health experts, masks seem like a simple, apolitical precaution. In medical jargon, they’re personal protective equipment, or PPE, like surgeons’ gowns, gloves and face screens. Nobody thinks a doctor, nurse or emergency medical technician is a coward for gearing up.

On the streets of everyday life, however, masks are something more. They aren’t like safety glasses, life preserver vests, or seatbelts — special protection for a limited task in a specialized environment.

Masks are clothing. They cover your body and change how you appear to the world.

Once you understand masks as clothing, the controversy becomes entirely predictable. Clothes don’t just protect us from the elements. They aren’t purely functional. They provide pleasure and

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A deaf fitness influencer says dark rooms, loud music, and Instagram Lives are ‘major barriers’ to gym class accessibility

India Morse is a deaf fitness instructor.
India Morse is a deaf fitness instructor.

India Morse

  • India Morse is a fitness instructor and influencer who was born deaf.

  • She spoke to Insider about the ways the fitness industry isn’t accessible enough for the deaf community.

  • For example, boutique studios are often too dark and Instagram Live workouts are impossible to follow without captions.

  • These barriers led Morse to create her own coaching platform, complete with subtitles and voiceovers on all videos.

  • “Put in your earplugs and see how you get on — then you’ll know how to make it more accessible!” she said.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Take a glance at India Morse’s Instagram feed and you’d be forgiven for thinking she was just another fitness influencer posting workouts, healthy recipes, and the odd mirror selfie. 

But look a little more closely and you’ll learn that Morse, whose handle is @youleanmeup, has a mission greater

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Global virus infections top 10 million

Global infections from the novel coronavirus have surpassed 10 million as the rate of new cases surges, according to an AFP tally on Sunday.

One million new cases were recorded in only six days, according to the AFP count, just as countries start to unwind punishing lockdowns that have devastated their economies and thrown millions out of work.

The worldwide death toll from the disease that first emerged in China about six months ago is also nearing 500,000 as fears grow of a full-blown second wave.

The United States, the hardest hit country, has surpassed 2.5 million cases alone, as efforts to reopen the world’s economic powerhouse were set back by a jump in new infections in states such as Florida.

Infections are also up in some other parts of the world that have reopened, with Europe now registering over 2.6 million, according to the AFP tally based on official

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why Republicans are set for Florida convention amid pandemic

<span>Photograph: Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images</span>
Photograph: Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Every four years, Democrats and Republicans stage their national conventions, huge primetime events at which presidential nominations are formally bestowed amid cascades of balloons, in front of cheering crowds.

On 20 August, a little more than two months before election day, Joe Biden will duly accept the Democratic nomination in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. A week later, Donald Trump will be crowned by Republicans in Jacksonville, Florida.

Related: Trump mocks ‘basement’ strategy but prudent approach pays off for Biden

Thanks to the coronavirus pandemic, almost everything else will not proceed as usual. But the two parties will follow radically different paths.

This week, as the US death toll passed 124,000 and cases surged in many states, Democrats announced a slimmed-down convention, mostly online and with physical events staged under guidance from public health experts. Biden’s speech, for example, has been moved to a smaller venue.

Republicans have also

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