Supplement

Trump’s campaign to open schools provokes mounting backlash even from GOP

President Donald Trump has been on a rampage against public schools and colleges all week, threatening to use the power of the federal government to strong-arm officials into reopening classrooms.

But his effort is now creating a backlash: An overwhelming alignment of state and even Republican-aligned organizations oppose the rush to reopen schools. The nation’s leading pediatricians, Republican state school chiefs, Christian colleges and even the U.S. Chamber of Commerce have all challenged parts of Trump’s pressure campaign.

“Threats are not helpful,” Joy Hofmeister, the Republican state superintendent of public instruction in Oklahoma, told POLITICO on Friday. “We do not need to be schooled on why it’s important to reopen.”

Both Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos have issued federal funding threats to schools that don’t fully reopen. On Friday, Trump went a step further in blasting online learning — which many school districts and colleges are planning to use

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Trump campaign to open schools provokes mounting backlash even from GOP

President Donald Trump has been on a rampage against public schools and colleges all week, threatening to use the power of the federal government to strong-arm officials into reopening classrooms.

But his effort is now creating a backlash: An overwhelming alignment of state and even Republican-aligned organizations oppose the rush to reopen schools. The nation’s leading pediatricians, Republican state school chiefs, Christian colleges and even the U.S. Chamber of Commerce have all challenged parts of Trump’s pressure campaign.

“Threats are not helpful,” Joy Hofmeister, the Republican state superintendent of public instruction in Oklahoma, told POLITICO on Friday. “We do not need to be schooled on why it’s important to reopen.”

Both Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos have issued federal funding threats to schools that don’t fully reopen. On Friday, Trump went a step further in blasting online learning — which many school districts and colleges are planning to use

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A woman who overdosed on enough caffeine powder to make 56 cups of coffee was hospitalized for a week, and doctors say her birth control didn’t help

pure caffeine
pure caffeine

Kevin Loria/Business Insider

  • Caffeine, a stimulant in coffee and tea, can be dangerous or fatal in large amounts.

  • Caffeine supplements can be especially risky since pills or powders are highly concentrated. 

  • In a recent case study, a 26-year-old woman went to intensive care for a week after overdosing on 2 teaspoons of powdered caffeine, equal to 56 cups of coffee. 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

If you’re like 90% of adults in the western world, you rely on coffee, tea, or similar beverages to kick off your morning or power through an afternoon of work.

But caffeine, the active ingredient that gives those drinks their energizing powers, can be deadly in large amounts. And for highly concentrated supplements in pill or powdered form, even a small portion contains as much caffeine as gallons of brewed coffee. 

Such was the case with one 26-year-old woman, who experienced difficulty

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Here’s how to pick an online school next year

South Florida school options are diminishing almost daily. The pressure is mounting on parents to figure out how to make sure their kids get a quality education next year.

Palm Beach County schools will likely offer online-only instruction when the school year starts Aug. 10. Miami-Dade schools are also planning virtual-only learning to open the school year Aug. 24. Broward will make a decision on how to open schools in the coming weeks.

So what else is out there? There are private schools, some of which already have announced they will reopen for in-person classes, and charter schools, which are publicly funded but privately managed.

Then there are the public online schools that have been around for years, including Florida Virtual School and county-run virtual schools.

Decisions must be made soon. Some county virtual schools want applications by next week, while Florida Virtual’s deadline is July 31.

Here’s a primer

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Today’s Definition of Financial Adulthood Is More Flexible Than Ever

The financial milestones of adulthood used to be pretty clear-cut: 30-somethings were expected to get married, buy a home and have children. In fact, when the popular TV show “thirtysomething” hit the airwaves in 1987, back when many of today’s 30-somethings were in diapers, the show revolved around parenting young kids while climbing career ladders.

More recent hit shows about 30-somethings are more likely to feature characters experiencing underemployment (“Fleabag”), adult children living with parents (“Schitt’s Creek”), and dating with no marriage in sight (“Master of None”). (Producers are currently shopping around a sequel to the original “thirtysomething,” revolving around the original characters’ now-30-something children.) And all of those shows were conceived before the COVID-19 pandemic hit, which has created even more financial strain for this generation.

In the real world, statistics from the Pew Research Center back up the shift toward delayed traditional milestones: Millennials, ages 24 to 39,

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I’m running a ‘Common Sense Camp’ for my kids this summer

Oona Hanson is an educator based in Los Angeles, California. Her story “I’m Running a ‘Common Sense Camp’ for My Kids This Summer,” was originally published on Forge by Medium in June, and is reprinted here with permission.

One of my favorite single-panel comics from Gary Larson’s “The Far Side” features a boy pushing mightily against a door marked “pull.” Above him, a sign announces the building as a “School for the Gifted.”

It’s an image I’ve thought about more than once since becoming a parent. As my kids — now 12 and 17 — got older, it became clear that they were, let’s say, heavy on the book smarts. Sometimes, when my husband and I would observe our children struggling with ordinary tasks, we’d joke that they could benefit from Common Sense Camp.

The joke was never entirely that funny. In her book “How To Raise an Adult,” a

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11 Side Gigs You Can Do From Home

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The rapid changes we experienced worldwide to slow the spread of the new coronavirus were, to put it lightly, tough on the wallet.

Whether your work hours have been reduced, you’ve been laid off from a full-time job, or you need a break from gigs that don’t allow social distancing like ride share or grocery delivery, finding a new source of income without leaving home might be daunting. 

You can always find work-from-home jobs though our portal. But maybe you just need something to get by for now until this all blows over.

Side gigs are a great way to bolster your bank account, and you can find a ton of online gigs that never require you to leave the

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Back-to-School Shopping Will Experience New Shifts in Consumer Behavior Amid Uncertainty

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According to data from Deloitte consumers plan to spend $10.4 billion online this back-to-school season, up from $8.1 billion in 2019.

For many families, b-t-s shopping is an annual ritual to stock up on backpacks, school supplies and new clothes for the school year. But in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic research from Deloitte suggests this year’s shopping will look a bit different. After 12 years of observing the b-t-s season, Deloitte noted in its 2020 b-t-s report that nothing has caused disruption to families, schools, and retailers like COVID-19.

More from WWD

While b-t-s typically marks a time of transition, this year is lingering in a time of uncertainty. For back-to-college shoppers, this uncertainty is influencing overall consumer behavior. In its survey, Deloitte found 62 percent of parents are anxious about sending kids back to college as coronavirus continues to linger.

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If Your Vitamins Are Missing These Ingredients, You’re Shopping Wrong

Have you ever browsed the aisles of your local drugstore or scrolled through Amazon, trying to figure out exactly which supplement is best? You might want to start taking vitamin D, but just looking at all the ones that are for sale out there can seem overwhelming. So you inevitably choose the one with the highest ratings or the coolest-looking bottle or the kind that you’ve seen on your friend’s kitchen counter.

While it can be easy to go with something that’s popular or that your friends trust, there are some things to keep in mind when shopping for vitamins. You’ll want to be sure that what you’re buying is actually effective and safe—because who wants to shell out money for something that isn’t going to help you at all?

And it’s important to note that your diet should always come first when it comes to getting those nutrients you

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The best student discounts we found for 2020

Shopping

Amazon Prime

Student version

Amazon

If you’re not piggy-backing off of your parents’ Amazon Prime account, you can have the subscription for less while you’re in school. College students can get Prime Student for $6.50 per month or $60 per year, and it includes the same perks as a standard Prime membership including free two-day shipping, free same-day delivery in select areas, and access to the entire Prime Video library. Amazon also currently offers a six-month free trial, so you’ll pay even less during your first year.

Buy Prime Student at Amazon – $60/year

Shipt

Shipt is similar to DoorDash but for groceries and household essentials: Pay an annual fee and you can get same-day delivery from numerous stores including Target, Costco and CVS. Shipt’s student plan costs $50 for the year — a 50-percent discount from the normal price — and you get the first two weeks free. Just double

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