Coronavirus

University professors fear returning to campus as coronavirus cases surge

Laura Crary, an art history professor at a liberal arts college in South Carolina, is anxious to return to the classroom, so much so that she was prescribed anti-anxiety medications for the first time in her life.

“I am 62.5 years old, which means I’m four years from full retirement age, or I’d probably retire right now because I’m very nervous,” she said.

While the final fall 2020 plans at her college are still pending, professors at her university were told that conducting solely online classes was not an option. Crary asked that NBC News not name the college.

As coronavirus cases start to surge in more than 30 states across the U.S., some professors are pushing back when it comes to returning to campus for in-person teaching. More than 50% of colleges and universities have announced they will be hosting professors or students back on campus in the next

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During Coronavirus, Investment Money Floods Into Wellness

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The coronavirus pandemic has put a damper on a lot of things, but wellness M&A is not one of them.

Consumer interest in being healthy has never been higher, experts agree, and during the COVID-19 pandemic that has translated into higher sales in categories like supplements, at-home fitness and self-care. Deals have followed, with Lululemon paying $500 million for Mirror, an interactive at-home fitness service, Grove Collaborative acquiring Sundaily, a gummy supplement brand centered around skin health, and Nestlé Health Science agreeing to buy a majority stake in Vital Proteins, which makes collagen supplements, beverages and food products.

“Wellness has become the number-one priority for consumers through COVID-19, and likely to remain the top priority for consumers after COVID-19,” said William S. Hood, founder and chief executive officer of William Hood & Co., an investment bank that specializes in the supplements space.

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Tulsa City Health Official Says Trump Rally ‘Likely Contributed’ to Surge of New Coronavirus Cases

Tulsa City-County Health Department Director Dr. Bruce Dart says President Donald Trump’s campaign rally in Tulsa in late June “likely contributed” to the new surge of coronavirus cases in the area.

On Wednesday, Dart told the Associated Press that the large gathering “more than likely” contributed to the spike, as it drew in thousands of participants — and protesters.

“In the past few days, we’ve seen almost 500 new cases, and we had several large events just over two weeks ago, so I guess we just connect the dots,” Dart said.

Tulsa County reported 261 confirmed new cases on Monday, a one-day record high for the area. On Tuesday it reported another 206 cases. In the week leading up the rally, which took place on Saturday, June 20, the county only reported 76 cases on Monday and 96 on Tuesday, per the department’s database. 

As of Thursday afternoon, July 9,

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How the coronavirus is changing the influencer business, according to marketers and top Instagram and YouTube stars

Macy Mariano.
Macy Mariano.

Macy Mariano.

  • Marketers and digital creators are adjusting to rapid changes in the influencer-marketing industry as the coronavirus continues to spread globally.

  • As with most businesses in the ad industry, professionals are trimming budgets, canceling events, and looking for alternative revenue streams.

  • Business Insider spoke with influencer-marketing professionals across the industry to better understand how they are adjusting their businesses to continue to earn a living during the coronavirus pandemic and the resulting economic turmoil. 

  • Subscribe to Business Insider’s influencer newsletter: Influencer Dashboard.

This post will be added to when new information becomes available and was last updated on July 9, 2020.

As the near-term effects of the coronavirus outbreak continue to be felt across the global economy, businesses and creators in the influencer-marketing industry are doing their best to adapt.

Influencers have seen some of their sponsorship deals shut down and events cancelled, with many shifting their

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Best Ways To Sell Your Car During the Coronavirus Crisis

Thanks to the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic, life across the globe has turned upside down. Even formerly common activities, such as dining out or shopping for groceries, have become difficult to conduct safely in 2020. Selling a car is no exception, as the process generally involves close contact with a number of people. GOBankingRates came up with a list of safety precautions for you to consider so that you can still sell your car safely during the coronavirus crisis.

Last updated: July 9, 2020

Thoroughly Clean and Disinfect Your Car

No matter when you are selling your car, you should thoroughly clean and sanitize it before you show it to buyers. However, in the COVID-19 era, a thorough disinfection is required.

Not only will disinfecting keep both you and your potential buyers safe, it can also be used in your marketing ad. Certain buyers may be interested to know that you

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Coronavirus spike jeopardizes opening of schools, L.A. County’s top health official warns

Cerritos Elementary School Principal Perla Chavez-Fritz, left, shows her Glendale campus to L.A. County schools Supt. Debra Duardo. School districts statewide face decisions on how and when to reopen their campuses. <span class="copyright">(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Cerritos Elementary School Principal Perla Chavez-Fritz, left, shows her Glendale campus to L.A. County schools Supt. Debra Duardo. School districts statewide face decisions on how and when to reopen their campuses. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

The pending reopening of K-12 campuses is suddenly at risk because of the ongoing surge of coronavirus cases, and all public and private schools must prepare for students to continue learning entirely from home, Los Angeles County’s top public health official has told local education leaders.

This sobering message was delivered by county Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer, in what she termed an “off the record” phone call Tuesday afternoon with district superintendents and others that was not intended for the media or the public. The Times obtained a recording of the call.

“Every single school district at this point needs to have plans in place to continue distance learning for 100% of

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With No End in Sight to the Coronavirus, Some Teachers Are Retiring Rather Than Going Back to School

When Christina Curfman thought about whether she could return to her second-grade classroom in the fall, she struggled to imagine the logistics. How would she make sure her 8-year-old students kept their face masks on all day? How would they do hands-on science experiments that required working in pairs? How would she keep six feet of distance between children accustomed to sharing desks and huddling together on one rug to read books?

“The only way to keep kids six feet apart is to have four or five kids,” says Curfman, a teacher at Catoctin Elementary School in Leesburg, Virginia, who typically has 22 students in a class. Her district shut schools on March 12, and at least 55 staff members have since tested positive for the coronavirus. “Classrooms in general are pretty tight,” she says. “And then how do you teach a reading group, how do you teach someone one-on-one

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Hoboken Coronavirus Testing Site Closes Temporarily; Updates

HOBOKEN, NJ — Hoboken Mayor Ravi Bhalla said in an update on Tuesday night that the city’s uptown coronavirus testing center will close from Wednesday through Sunday, but alternatives are being offered in nearby towns during that time.

“Dr. Brahmbhatt informed me that he is unavailable for the next three days, which will result in the Riverside testing site at 14th and Jefferson Street to be closed until Monday,” Bhalla said. “We wish Dr. Brahmbhatt and his staff a restful and well-deserved time off.”

Testing demand has remained high in this mile-square city of 53,000 people, particularly with the mayor recently saying that cases are rising again.

Over the past two days, the city’s volunteer emergency response team has fielded 400 calls for testing, Bhalla said.

In addition, Bhalla and Gov. Phil Murphy have said that New Jerseyans returning from 19 states with coronavirus spikes should get tested and self-quarantine

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Coronavirus is revolutionizing scientific practices and communication. Here’s how.

MILWAUKEE – In June 2019, a team of scientists and editors launched an online server where medical researchers could submit articles. The team’s goal was to help the medical community more quickly share research findings and learn from one another. 

By the end of the year, the team was receiving about 75 submissions per week.

Then COVID-19 appeared. 

Now, nearly that many submissions come in each day.

“I’m thrilled, I’m really thrilled!” said Harlan Krumholz, one of the founders of the server, medRxiv (pronounced “med archive”). “It’s really speeding the ability for scientists to be able to communicate with each other and understand what each other is doing.”

Just as everyday life has been affected by COVID-19, science itself has changed.

Related video: Food service workers struggle with working through COVID-19

Faced with a brand new, incurable and deadly disease, scientists have had to learn how to produce meaningful information

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Third of Britons say they may not take coronavirus vaccine

Almost a third of Britons definitely will not or are unsure about whether they will take up a COVID-19 vaccine. (PA)
Almost a third of Britons definitely will not or are unsure about whether they will take up a COVID-19 vaccine. (PA)

Almost a third of Britons say they may not take up a vaccine for coronavirus, a poll showed, as researchers warned about the amount of anti-vaccine content circulating online.

In the study carried out by YouGov for the Centre for Countering Digital Hate (CCDH) research group, 6% of those polled said they definitely would not get vaccinated for COVID-19.

A further 10% said they would “probably not” have a vaccine, while another 15% said they did not know, meaning a total of 31% will not have one or are unsure about it.

Researchers also warned about the large amount of anti-vax misinformation spreading on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram.

The survey polled more than 1,600 people in Britain, and found 38% said they would “definitely” have a coronavirus vaccination

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