Female doctors share bikini photos after male-led study calls it ‘unprofessional’

Getty Images/iStockphoto
Getty Images/iStockphoto

Women doctors are sharing photographs on social media of themselves wearing bikinis after a study conducted by a predominantly male team described doing so as “unprofessional”.

The study in question, titled “Prevalence of unprofessional social media content among young vascular surgeons”, was recently published in the Journal of Vascular Surgery.

The authors said that “publicly available social media content” posted by vascular surgeons “may affect patient choice of physician, hospital and medical facility”.

They stated that “potentially unprofessional content” included pictures of vascular surgeons wearing “inappropriate attire”, such as “pictures in underwear, provocative Halloween costumes, and provocative posing in bikinis/swimwear”.

Following the publication of the study, doctors on social media have been pushing back against the notion that sharing pictures of themselves wearing bikinis makes them any less professional or capable of carrying out their jobs.

Numerous women doctors have been sharing pictures online of themselves wearing

Read More

In Era of Sickness, Doctors Prescribe Unusual Cure: Voting

Dr. Alister Martin starts his commute to Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, where he has created a kiosk to register patients to vote. (Tony Luong/The New York Times)
Dr. Alister Martin starts his commute to Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, where he has created a kiosk to register patients to vote. (Tony Luong/The New York Times)

BOSTON — The sign is easy to miss in the waiting room of the emergency department at Massachusetts General Hospital, next to the reception desk and a hand sanitizer pump. “Register to vote here,” it says, above an iPad attached to a podium.

The kiosk has stood there since November, before the pandemic began, and stayed there through the worst weeks of April, when 12 gasping patients were put on ventilators during a single grueling 12-hour shift.

Now, as the number of coronavirus patients has slowed to a trickle, Dr. Alister Martin, the 31-year-old emergency room doctor who built the kiosk, is determined to keep trying to register voters.

“There will be a time where, above the din of suffering, we ask,

Read More

Why the new doctor’s office is your own home

What do you do when you can’t go to the doctor’s office? As the COVID-19 pandemic has forced people around the world to stay at home and avoid crowded and possibly contaminated areas, this has become a big concern.

The pandemic has spurred a new wave of innovation, shedding new light on online diagnosis and remote care technologies that have been around for a while but have been limited to the doctor’s office.

The Dutch startup community, one of the fastest-growing technology hubs in Europe, has played a key role in developing new tools and facilities to make sure doctors can monitor and care for patients remotely. Techleap.nl, a non-profit responsible for accelerating the Dutch startup ecosystem, has helped nurture and grow health-tech startups that are now providing remote care services in the Netherlands and beyond.

Here are just a few areas of medicine where startups are making doctor’s office

Read More

The Best Way to Help a Poison Ivy Rash Heal Quickly, According to Doctors

Photo credit: NoDerog - Getty Images
Photo credit: NoDerog – Getty Images

From Prevention

Having more time to explore nature is a sweet perk of summer, but dealing with a poison ivy rash that pops up after trekking through greenery isn’t the ideal way to end your outdoor adventures.

Poison ivy is found in most parts of the U.S., except Alaska, Hawaii, and parts of the West Coast, according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It can grow as either a vine or a small shrub that trails along the ground, and it can climb on low plants, trees, and poles. Poison ivy is usually identified by its three shiny leaves that bud from one small stem, the FDA says.

But here’s the tricky part: Poison ivy can change color. Its leaves are reddish in the spring, green in the summer, and yellow, orange, or red in the fall. It can also have greenish-white flowers

Read More

Doctors Have Another Enemy To Fight Besides COVID-19 Itself. This Might Help Them.

"About 80% percent of my patients scheduled appointments just for information on COVID-19." (Photo: Rostislav_Sedlacek via Getty Images)
“About 80% percent of my patients scheduled appointments just for information on COVID-19.” (Photo: Rostislav_Sedlacek via Getty Images)

Within a week of the first COVID-19 case in Michigan, my practice had fully transitioned to telehealth. I went from putting my hands on patients to seeing them from my kitchen on my iPad.

The first few days were busy with patients who had flu-like symptoms and those facing grave anxiety. By the third day, I felt the need for a new medical diagnostic code: Misinformation. (Diagnostic codes are a combination of letters or numbers used to identify disease and reasons for patient encounters, for the purpose of medical charting, billing and research.)

Many false claims are circulating about the virus, which leads to harmful consequences to patients. Patients are panicked and confused, and in some cases this is leading them to do things like ingesting harsh chemicals or overdosing on herbal

Read More

Do children spread coronavirus? What doctors say about going back to school

President Donald Trump is pressing state and local officials to reopen schools this fall, despite coronavirus infections surging nationwide. While experts say there are significant social benefits to resuming in-person classes, they caution that schools will need to balance those against potential risks to provide a safe learning environment for students — as well as teachers and administrators.

Evidence suggests that children are not as susceptible as adults to COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. Even among those who have been infected, it’s relatively rare for children to develop serious complications or require hospitalization.

But this doesn’t mean classrooms can be exempt from social distancing and other safety precautions, particularly if schools intend to welcome kids back on site in less than two months.

“It really shouldn’t be a debate of getting kids back to school, but getting kids back to school safely,” said Dr. Jennifer Lighter, a pediatric

Read More

Virus spread, not politics should guide schools, doctors say

As the Trump administration pushes full steam ahead to force schools to resume in-person education, public health experts warn that a one-size-fits-all reopening could drive infection and death rates even higher.

They’re urging a more cautious approach, which many local governments and school districts are already pursuing.

There are too many uncertainties and variables, they say, for back-to-school to be back-to-normal.

Where is the virus spreading rapidly? Do students live with aged grandparents? Do teachers have high-risk health conditions that would make online teaching safest? Do infected children easily spread COVID-19 to each other and to adults?

Regarding the latter, some evidence suggests they don’t, but a big government study aims to find better proof. Results won’t be available before the fall, and some schools are slated to reopen in just a few weeks.

“These are complicated issues. You can’t just charge straight ahead,” Dr. Tom Frieden, former director of

Read More

A woman who overdosed on enough caffeine powder to make 56 cups of coffee was hospitalized for a week, and doctors say her birth control didn’t help

pure caffeine
pure caffeine

Kevin Loria/Business Insider

  • Caffeine, a stimulant in coffee and tea, can be dangerous or fatal in large amounts.

  • Caffeine supplements can be especially risky since pills or powders are highly concentrated. 

  • In a recent case study, a 26-year-old woman went to intensive care for a week after overdosing on 2 teaspoons of powdered caffeine, equal to 56 cups of coffee. 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

If you’re like 90% of adults in the western world, you rely on coffee, tea, or similar beverages to kick off your morning or power through an afternoon of work.

But caffeine, the active ingredient that gives those drinks their energizing powers, can be deadly in large amounts. And for highly concentrated supplements in pill or powdered form, even a small portion contains as much caffeine as gallons of brewed coffee. 

Such was the case with one 26-year-old woman, who experienced difficulty

Read More

Doctors, teachers reject Trump’s pressure to reopen U.S. schools

By Susan Heavey

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Groups representing the nation’s doctors, teachers and top school officials on Friday pushed back against pressure from President Donald Trump to fully reopen U.S. schools despite a surge in coronavirus cases, saying science must guide the decisions.

“Public health agencies must make recommendations based on evidence, not politics,” the American Academy of Pediatrics, two national teachers’ unions and a school superintendents’ group said, following days of threats by Trump to choke off federal education funds if schools do not open their doors for the upcoming academic year.

“We should leave it to health experts to tell us when the time is best to open up school buildings, and listen to educators and administrators to shape how we do it,” AAP, the American Federation of Teachers, the National Education Association and the School Superintendents Association said in a joint statement.

Their call was echoed by

Read More

Walgreens to open 500 to 700 in-store clinics with primary care doctors in deal with VillageMD

The doctor will see you now … at Walgreens.

Walgreens plans to staff 500 to 700 of its stores with primary care doctors in the next five years in a partnership with medical services provider VillageMD.

The company, which has nearly 9,300 locations in the U.S., announced the plan Wednesday morning, saying it would also invest in VillageMD.

It will open the primary care clinics under the brand Village Medical at Walgreens. The clinics will be spread out among more than 30 markets, with more than half located in locations that are underserved by medical professionals.

The move marks the latest evolution in the drug store sector’s pivot away from retail floor space toward more healthcare services.

Walgreens’ archrival, CVS, has invested in its own in-store clinical services brand called MinuteClinic, which is offered at about 1,100 locations. CVS is also opening up to 1,500 HealthHUB locations that will include

Read More