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Pandemic Changes the Face of Pop-Ups

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As retail reopens around the U.S., pop-ups are popping up more than ever.

For the past few years, these temporary retail spaces were all the rage for companies seeking a relatively inexpensive way to test the brick-and-mortar waters. The strategy was so successful with both brands and landlords that pop-ups were pervasive on seemingly every street in urban areas around the country.

Then the pandemic hit and all retail locations were forced to close, including pop-ups. Now that brick-and-mortar sites have begun reopening, the landscape is markedly different. Consumers are still wary of going back to stores as the coronavirus continues to have a profound effect on the way we live our lives. Retailers have had to institute wide-scale changes in how they operate to convince customers that it’s safe for them to return — masks, gloves, Plexiglass shields, constant disinfecting of high-touch

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Where to Buy Face Masks Online That Are Stylish

The fashion world is stepping up in a time of need: Countless companies are now making, selling and donating non-medical grade face masks for daily protection from COVID-19.

Demand for cloth face mask options has soared in recent months, in part because the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommends wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) masks in public settings to help slow the spread of COVID-19. PPE masks are usually made from breathable a fabric like cotton and differ from a surgical mask and N95 respirators that experts say should be reserved for health care workers who are caring for the sick.

In times of crisis, it’s heartwarming to see companies we love giving back using the tools and skills they know best. Nordstrom, the largest employer of tailors in the country, has trained its alterations teams to make face masks to distribute to health care workers, while designer

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Try This 60-Second Hack to Make Your Face Mask Fit Better

Photo credit: TikTok
Photo credit: TikTok

From Woman’s Day

Wearing a mask in public is basically the norm these days (or at least, it should be). But let’s be real, surgical masks aren’t perfect. Namely, they can have a loose fit and allow potentially infected particles to get to your nose and mouth.

Well, dentist Olivia Cuid, M.D., has a hack for making surgical masks fit better over your face, and it’s genius. (BTW: This can work for cloth face masks, too.)

Cuid shared the hack in a TikTok that’s already racked up 395,000 views. With a surgical-style mask, “the sides of your face are left very exposed to the outside,” Cuid points out. So, she recommends this trick:

  • Fold your mask in half

  • Tie a knot with the ear loops on each side as close as possible to the mask

  • Open up your mask

  • There will be a little opening on the

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This Dentist’s 60-Second Hack to Make Your Face Mask Fit Better Is Going Viral

When 2020 began, most Americans likely didn’t anticipate a reality in which we’d all be wearing (or should be wearing!) a face mask while out in public. But that’s the reality of life in the age of coronavirus. In some cities and counties, face masks are required in any place where you are not able to safely social distance. 

The facial coverings are, of course, recommended by the CDC to help prevent the spread of COVID-19, but anyone who’s attempted to wear a surgical mask can tell you that they don’t always fits properly. Enter dentist Olivia Cuid, who shared a 60-second mask hack on her TikTok that is now going viral. 

In the clip, Cuid shows you how to take a standard surgical mask and make it fit your face better—and it’s pretty fantastic. The video has already racked up over 400,000 views for good reason. “In absence of

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This 60-Second Hack to Make Your Face Mask Fit Better Is Going Viral on TikTok

Photo credit: TikTok
Photo credit: TikTok

From Prevention

  • Dentist Olivia Cuid, M.D., shared a new hack for making your surgical mask fit better.

  • She demonstrated the trick in a TikTok video that quickly went viral.

  • The video was shared and reposted by both Katie Couric and Kristen Bell.

Wearing a mask in public is basically the norm these days (or at least, it should be). But let’s be real, surgical masks aren’t perfect. Namely, they can have a loose fit and allow potentially infected particles to get to your nose and mouth.

Well, dentist Olivia Cuid, M.D., has a hack for making surgical masks fit better over your face, and it’s genius. (BTW: This can work for cloth face masks, too.)

Cuid shared the hack in a TikTok that’s already racked up 395,000 views. With a surgical-style mask, “the sides of your face are left very exposed to the outside,” Cuid points out.

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School District Opts To Reopen Schools, Make Face Masks Mandatory

TAMPA, FL — The Hillsborough County superintendent of schools has announced that students and staff returning to public schools on Aug. 10 will be required to wear face masks.

After meeting with health officials, business leaders, teachers and school administrators, Superintendent Addison Davis said he believes masks are the best option at this time for keeping students and staff safe from the spread of the coronavirus on campus.

The district will provide three reusable face coverings for each student on the first day of school and three reusable face coverings for each staff member during back-to-school pre-planning.

“The CDC has identified face masks as one of the most effective tools in stopping the spread of COVID-19,” Davis said. “I believe face coverings is the best option we have for providing additional protection for everyone on our campuses.”

He said the county has already acquired 760,000 masks through purchases and donations.

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2020 graduates face uncertain job market with hope

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – If everything had gone according to plan, Missy Wood thought she’d have a job helping at-risk youths by now. 

Wood, a recent graduate of Middle Tennessee State University, saw her internship with Court-Appointed Special Advocates end abruptly in March as the COVID-19 pandemic took root in Tennessee. She started applying for jobs with the Department of Children’s Services and similar organizations in April.

By the time she graduated in May, new job postings for her chosen career had all but disappeared.

Wood is one of the thousands of graduates across the nation who face a turbulent job market amid the novel coronavirus pandemic. More than 47 million Americans have filed jobless benefit claims since the middle of March, according to the Labor Department.  

Eli Kellum, 7, climbs on the back of babysitter Missy Wood in the Kellum family's backyard in Murfreesboro on June 18, 2020, as the two play on the trampoline. Wood has been looking for work since April but has not been able to find any child-focused social work positions since graduating from MTSU in May. After the pandemic hit, job postings for her planned career seemed to disappear.
Eli Kellum, 7, climbs on the back of babysitter Missy Wood in the Kellum family’s backyard in Murfreesboro on June 18, 2020, as the
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Pregnant women in abusive relationships face ‘jail sentences for buying abortion pills online’

200 GPs have signed up to provide abortion services in Ireland, but four counties are still without provision: Getty/iStock
200 GPs have signed up to provide abortion services in Ireland, but four counties are still without provision: Getty/iStock

Pregnant women trapped in abusive relationships who are too scared to get a termination at a clinic due to concerns their partner will find out could face jail sentences for buying abortion pills online, campaigners have warned.

Leading charities are urging the government to change the domestic abuse bill to protect pregnant women living with abusive partners.

A cross-party group of MPs is set to introduce an amendment to the landmark legislation which is currently going through through the House of Commons to decriminalise consensual abortion and bolster the law around non-consensual abortions.

Women living in the UK still face life in prison for an abortion at any stage of their pregnancy without getting the permission of two doctors – with campaigners noting this is “one of the harshest punishments in

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Does your face mask need a filter? We asked medical experts what to look for

We’re all getting used to wearing face coverings while out and about, and you may have noticed that several masks have a small slot to place a filter for extra protection.

Adding a filter in between the layers of your face mask can help block airborne particles that might sneak through the fabric, and can offer some much need reassurance during these uncertain times.

Luckily, you don’t have to spend a fortune on face mask filters, as there are several budget-friendly options available online. To help you get started, Shop TODAY consulted a few health experts to learn what filter materials are most effective, how often you should swap them out and where you can buy them online.

Why you should use a filter in your face mask

When used in conjunction with social distancing practices, cloth face masks can help slow the spread of coronavirus. However, not all masks

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Restaurants face high fees from delivery apps. Uber buying Postmates will make it worse.

Restaurants face high fees from delivery apps. Uber buying Postmates will make it worse.
Restaurants face high fees from delivery apps. Uber buying Postmates will make it worse.

Nobu Shiozawa is determined to get customers his restaurant’s homemade tofu and sushi without using delivery apps such as Uber Eats, Grubhub, DoorDash, and Postmates.

That’s not easy these days. Thanks to COVID-19, New York City banned restaurant dining in March. So Shiozawa, who owns and manages in New York City, uses his own small crew to avoid high commissions from the apps, usually .

“If I start using the food delivery service providers during the pandemic, the number of orders and the amount of sales would be increased,” he admitted.

But then he would have to hire more workers to handle the extra orders, which was hard for him to justify with the high fees and the fact he cut more than 60 percent of his staff after the pandemic started.

Image: Nobu Shiozawa

Image:

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