pandemic

Pandemic Changes the Face of Pop-Ups

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As retail reopens around the U.S., pop-ups are popping up more than ever.

For the past few years, these temporary retail spaces were all the rage for companies seeking a relatively inexpensive way to test the brick-and-mortar waters. The strategy was so successful with both brands and landlords that pop-ups were pervasive on seemingly every street in urban areas around the country.

Then the pandemic hit and all retail locations were forced to close, including pop-ups. Now that brick-and-mortar sites have begun reopening, the landscape is markedly different. Consumers are still wary of going back to stores as the coronavirus continues to have a profound effect on the way we live our lives. Retailers have had to institute wide-scale changes in how they operate to convince customers that it’s safe for them to return — masks, gloves, Plexiglass shields, constant disinfecting of high-touch

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Here’s how small businesses threatened by COVID-19 are surviving the pandemic

With the unemployment rate at 11.1% and businesses shut down in every state, COVID-19 has taken a crippling toll on America’s economic health.

MORE: Small businesses rethink their approach amid the pandemic to serve their customers

For many small businesses, which comprise 47% of private-sector payrolls in the U.S., according to the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council, the sudden economic downturn has created a full-blown crisis.

MORE: When coronavirus hit, these small businesses got creative, but they still need help

The big-picture concern shared by economists is if businesses don’t survive, many Americans won’t have jobs to return to after the pandemic. That’s why experts have said it’s important to support local businesses, which are struggling to generate reliable income.

Now, salons, restaurants, florists and fitness instructors, among others, are creatively adjusting to the new realities of the coronavirus economy, pivoting to bringing parts of their business online, connecting with

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The COVID-19 pandemic is affecting the future of Gen Z travel

Clarissa Fisher, 23, is nowhere near ready to hop on a plane. She used to fly regularly to visit her boyfriend in the U.K.

“This past week I have seen so many people return to their normal activities like nothing has happened,” Fisher, of Frankfort, Kentucky, tells USA TODAY. “This scares me and has made me reconsider my travel plans for the remainder of this year and possibly the next. I’m afraid to board a plane knowing that I might step off infected. Being trapped in a small space with a large amount of strangers for several hours is a pandemic nightmare scenario.” 

Like others in her generation, she’s grown up with crisis after crisis: From 9/11 to devastating school shootings to COVID-19, this generation, born after 1996, is used to living in dangerous times. This is a generation primed to handle crisis after crisis, and one that

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How one school district tends to students’ emotional health during coronavirus pandemic

SADDLE BROOK, N.J. — Three months ago, the Saddle Brook school district was making steady progress toward social and emotional learning as a part of a district initiative.

In-class yoga, mindfulness mantras and coping strategies for anxiety were part of the daily routine.

Then came the pandemic.

Virtual learning separated children from schoolmates and teachers at a time when the National Alliance on Mental Illness and other health experts were noting a surge in stress and depression. Next came the killing of George Floyd and racial tensions that heightened anxiety for many families. 

“I’m glad that we were in front of social and emotional learning, that we had this wellness initiative in place, because we had already been talking about it and doing it,” said Superintendent Danielle Shanley.

To address a complicated new reality, the entire faculty worked together to keep social and emotional learning at the forefront.  

“My concern

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Telehealth called a ‘silver lining’ of the COVID-19 pandemic. This time, it might stick

Telehealth use surged from 8% of Americans in December to 29% in May as primary care, mental health and specialists turned to remote care out of necessity during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a UnitedHealth Group report.

Telehealth evangelists long have touted using high-speed Internet connections and a range of devices to link providers and patients for remote care. But regulatory hurdles and medicine’s conservative culture limited virtual checkups to largely minor conditions like sinus infections or unique circumstances such as connecting neurologists to rural hospitals that lack specialized care.

The pandemic lockdowns closed doctors offices and delayed non-emergency care for millions of Americans. Some clinics scrambled to acquire technology platforms to deliver remote care. Others began employing rarely used video programs to reach patients in their homes.

Remote visits among Medicare patients surged through the end of March, prompting Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Director Seema Verma to

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Inside One Teen Girl’s Struggle to Manage Anxiety During the Pandemic

Kaylie Rosen was wrapping up a spring break internship in the field of her career dreams — pediatric physical therapy — and ready to return to boarding school in New Hampshire for the homestretch of her junior year. It was March, and the 17-year-old was already looking forward to summer break and a grand trip — part-tourist, part-volunteer — that would take her from Thailand to Laos to Ethiopia, where she was to work with orphans in the Selamta Family Project.

“Two days before we were supposed to come back to school, they were like, ‘Uh, don’t,’ ” Kaylie recalls in an interview with PEOPLE. “I had my heart set on these trips I had planned. Now it’s lots of Netflix and Hulu.”

But for Kaylie, the stakes are much higher than dashed college visits and canceled plane tickets. Having to self-isolate at home is a special challenge for her

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US daily cases top 50,000 for first time; Trump hopes pandemic will ‘disappear’; NFL cuts back preseason schedule

The U.S. death toll from the pandemic may be tens of thousands higher than reported and the total number of U.S. cases surpassed 50,000 for the first time Wednesday.

The Johns Hopkins data dashboard reported 50,655 new cases, pushing the U.S. total to more than 2.6 million since the pandemic began six months ago. The daily death count was 645. But a study out this week determined there were 87,000 more deaths than expected in the U.S. from March 1 to April 25, based on the average from the previous five years. Only 65% of those deaths were directly attributed to COVID-19, suggesting the rest were linked to the pandemic but not ruled as the main cause, researchers say.

President Donald Trump, discussing the pandemic during a Fox Business interview, said he thinks “at some point, that’s going to sort of just disappear, I hope.”

Meanwhile, Vice President Mike Pence

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How to handle financial anxiety during a pandemic

Levels have stress have gone up during the pandemic both over health fears as well as economic uncertainty. Photo: Getty
Levels have stress have gone up during the pandemic both over health fears as well as economic uncertainty. Photo: Getty

Millions of Brits are coping with stress and anxiety as they deal with the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, as well as the economic fallout as a result of COVID-19. When the UK’s lockdown began, nearly half of people experienced “high” anxiety, according to the Office for National Statistics, particularly the self-employed and those renting. Anxiety levels were highest among an estimated 8.6 million people whose income fell.

Although lockdown restrictions are beginning to ease and people are returning to work, the virus is continuing to impact our lives. The economic disruption has placed many financially vulnerable people in danger of further hardship.

More than one third (34%) of UK adults surveyed and in full-time work are concerned about losing their jobs, according to a survey of 4,246 adults aged 18 and

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Fauci says new cases could hit 100,000 daily; new ‘pandemic potential’ found in China; vaccine on track

A new pandemic threat could be simmering in China while at home the nation’s leading infectious disease expert warned that new cases could reach 100,000 per day if the trend isn’t averted.

“I think it is important to tell you and the American public that I’m very concerned because it could get very bad,” said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

More states are tightening restrictions aimed at tamping down the alarming boom in coronavirus cases. New York, New Jersey and Connecticut doubled the number of states on its quarantine list, to 16. Arizona delayed the start for in-class learning for the 2020-21 school year. Oregon and Kansas are the latest states that will begin to require face masks in public.

In China, researchers are concerned about a new swine flu strain in pigs that could have “pandemic potential.” Fauci, however, said the

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Fauci hopes for vaccine in early 2021; new ‘pandemic potential’ found in China; Arizona delays school openings

A new pandemic threat could be simmering in China while at home more states are tightening restrictions aimed at tamping down an alarming boom in coronavirus cases.

Arizona delayed the start for in-class learning for the 2020-21 school year. Oregon and Kansas are the latest states that will begin to require face masks in public.

“Modeling from the Oregon Health Authority shows that if we don’t take further action to reduce the spread of the disease, our hospitals could be overwhelmed by new COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations within weeks,” Oregon Gov. Kate Brown said. “The choices every single one of us make in the coming days matter.”

In New Jersey, Gov. Phil Murphy announced late Monday that the state would pause its planned reopening for indoor dining and banned smoking and drinking at Atlantic City casinos set to reopen this week.

And in China, researchers are concerned about a new

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