Parents play crucial role in helping children, teens cope with pandemic stress

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Find ways to stay connected and busy as a family. Even though they can’t see their friends like normal, there’s still plenty families can do together to enjoy themselves. Board games, picnicking and hiking are a few of Shefner’s family-time suggestions. Now is a good time, she added, to think about what activities you can do as the weather gets colder to stay engaged with each other and with external family and friends. Seeking refuge outdoors won’t be as easy in a few months.

Limit screen time, especially in the evenings. Adults have trouble disconnecting, so don’t assume children can police their own device use. The constant barrage of input from screens is mentally taxing for children, according to Shefner, not to mention the emotional impact of news and social media. “Along with the pandemic, so many other things are happening right now and there are a lot

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Depression in British adults may have doubled during coronavirus pandemic

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Some 19.2% of British adults likely had some form of depression in June, up from 9.7% before the pandemic, said the UK’s Office for National Statistics (ONS) in a report. Conversely, 3.5% of adults experienced an improvement in their symptoms of depression.

“Adults who were young, female, unable to afford an unexpected expense or disabled were the most likely to experience some form of depression during the pandemic,” said Tim Vizard, principal research officer at the ONS.

A large majority (84.9%) of adults experiencing some form of depression said they had been feeling stressed and anxious, and 42.2% said their relationships were being affected. In comparison, 20.7% of adults with no sign of depression said Covid-19 was impacting their relationships.

The results are based on a nationally representative survey of adults in Britain, the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey, which asks a series of questions in order to produce a score

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Thousands of Manitobans reaching out for mental health support amid COVID-19 pandemic

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a man sitting in front of a window: Coronavirus: Canadians struggling with mental health during pandemic


© Getty Images
Coronavirus: Canadians struggling with mental health during pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic is an added layer of anxiety and stress for many, but it also has many reaching out for help.

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In late March, the province launched an online program with Canadian HR firm Morneau Shepell, aimed at providing support for Manitobans struggling with anxiety and depression related to COVID-19.

Since then, 3,460 Manitobans have used the service, according to a provincial spokesperson.

“I can tell you that number has been steadily growing,” Manitoba health minister Cameron Friesen said during a press conference Tuesday.

“None of us are untouched by this. There (are) the challenges of COVID-19 that we can see and they’re tangible in our every day lives, but the mental health challenges and our anxiety is no less real even though it is more invisible.”

Read more: Manitoba launches online program targeting those anxious

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Tips for maintaining your mental health during COVID-19 pandemic

jhon yudha

Almost everyone has experienced some sense of loss or grieving during the pandemic.

Tips for maintaining your mental health during COVID-19 pandemic

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It could be losing a loved one, losing a job, or just mourning the loss of the way life used to be.

Grief can be overwhelming and unexpected endings can cause strong negative emotions. Mental health experts say it’s important to keep the following things in mind:

  • Acknowledge the feelings of loss without judgment, allow yourself to feel sad.
  • Stay connected and talk to friends and family — call, video chat or meet outside with precautions
  • Journaling can also help express feelings
  • Create a new routine. Be sure to include exercise, hobbies and sleep.
  • If you’re struggling, reach out to a mental health professional for help.

It’s been said getting through the pandemic is a marathon and not a sprint, which means it’s

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Health care services that cover HIV in the South disrupted by coronavirus pandemic

jhon yudha

The coronavirus pandemic has disrupted health care services in America, especially in the South, where HIV continues to plague the region.

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The South accounted for more than half of the country’s roughly 37,000 HIV infections in 2018 and has been a focus of the Trump administration’s goal of eradicating the disease by 2030 by focusing on hot spots for the infection and getting people on drugs.

Fewer people in the South are aware that they have HIV compared with other regions in the U.S., according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Parts of the so-called Black Belt — a poor agricultural region stretching from Louisiana to Virginia that was first known for the color of its soil and then for its mostly Black population — have particularly high rates of new HIV infections.

Health services have stopped or limited testing for

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We Asked People How the Pandemic Has Changed Their Approach to Health and Wellness

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This research is powered by the VICE Media Group audience. Using our websites and social channels, we invited the VICE, Refinery29, and i-D audiences to take an online survey in June 2020. We spoke to more than 4,000 people in more than 30 countries around the world. The majority of respondents were 16 to 39 years old.

How do you take care of your health and wellness during something so new and uncertain as a global pandemic? We asked readers of VICE Media properties around the world this very question. We found that in the midst of this global crisis, people are more concerned than ever with all elements of their health and wellness, with a doubling-down of priorities around emotional health in particular. Responses to our survey suggest that people are turning to simple, incremental ways to take care of their mental, physical, and medical health—methods that are within

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Beware of These 5 Mistakes That May be Hampering Your Fitness Progress During COVID-19 Pandemic

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Workout at home (Representational Image)


© Juhi Kumari | India.com Lifestyle Staff
Workout at home (Representational Image)


COVID-19 pandemic has brought a major change in everybody’s life. Those who are obsessed with workouts have no other option than to do their daily fitness exercises at home. Sometimes, this may seem boring and gradually demotivating. Working out at a gym is not at all similar to shedding sweat in one of the corners of your house. It doesn’t give you that much-needed vibe of keeping yourself fit and a sense of achievement. At home, there is an array of distractions that can make you skip certain exercises or avoid doing them perfectly. You must know that any mistake while doing exercise can cost too much by hampering your fitness progress. Here, we tell you about certain common mistakes that you could be doing during a workout at home.

Skipping Warm-up Sessions

Warm-up is extremely important to

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Pandemic weighs heavily on patients with rare diseases in Karnataka

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Some patients have run out of medicines and are forced to get stop-gap treatments from doctors.

It was February when Deputy Superintendent of Police Mahadev Maruthi Yadawad managed to procure an imported drug for his three-and-a-half-month-old baby to treat his seizures. A colleague who was in Bengaluru helped deliver it to Kalaburagi, where Mr. Yadawad lives. Little did he know that his child would soon be left with no medicine once the lockdown came into effect.

Life was already tough for patients with rare diseases. Few were aware of what ailed them, treatment was not available everywhere, and where it was available it was incredibly expensive. As their fight for adequate care yielded results, some governments, such as the one in Karnataka, stepped in to help. But since the lockdown, uncertainty has set in again.

Some patients have run out of medicines and are forced to get stop-gap treatments from

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Gardening in a Pandemic – Lifestyle – Columbus Monthly

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Blooming spring daffodils lured a Central Ohio writer into her garden and away from the many worries that came along with the season.

If there is an upside to the pandemic that upended our lives this spring, it is gardening. And, the garden surrounding our home flourished as I finally had time to slow down, appreciate its beauty and tackle some long overdue chores.

In the garden, I could go without a mask to escape health fears and financial worries surrounding the March 16 shutdown. My husband Brian closed his dental practice. Two of our adult children announced plans to return home from college. Our third child awaited news of a pending job transfer to COVID hotspot Chicago. And, as Spain reported record COVID cases my mom and stepdad crossed the Atlantic Ocean on a cruise ship headed there. During the following days, I dove into work assignments and fretted

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Gyms are ‘part of the solution’ to pandemic

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Planet Fitness CEO Chris Rondeau proposed gyms as “part of the solution” to the coronavirus pandemic, with fitness and exercise helping to combat issues such as obesity and cardiovascular disease.

Rondeau told “Sqwak Alley” that fitness should be viewed as a sector of health care, given that exercising can help minimize or alleviate health conditions that have been linked to great health impacts when contracting the virus. He said he expects people to have a renewed interest in exercise after the pandemic, given its link to health.

“If you think about it, gyms are really a part of the health care delivery system, and to shut us down is conterproductive,” Rondeau said. “We really are part of the solution, not the problem.”

Gyms and fitness centers have been among businesses hard hit, as they have often been the last to reopen in local economies. Gold’s Gyms and 24 Hour Fitness

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