Parents play crucial role in helping children, teens cope with pandemic stress

jhon yudha

Find ways to stay connected and busy as a family. Even though they can’t see their friends like normal, there’s still plenty families can do together to enjoy themselves. Board games, picnicking and hiking are a few of Shefner’s family-time suggestions. Now is a good time, she added, to think about what activities you can do as the weather gets colder to stay engaged with each other and with external family and friends. Seeking refuge outdoors won’t be as easy in a few months.

Limit screen time, especially in the evenings. Adults have trouble disconnecting, so don’t assume children can police their own device use. The constant barrage of input from screens is mentally taxing for children, according to Shefner, not to mention the emotional impact of news and social media. “Along with the pandemic, so many other things are happening right now and there are a lot

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Cobb Parents Push Back On Virtual Classes, Rally At Civic Center

jhon yudha

MARIETTA, GA — Parents and students lined up Saturday morning in front of the Cobb County Civic Center, chanting and waving signs to protest the school system’s decision to offer classes online only this fall.

“We’ve been emailing, we’ve been calling, we’ve been on TV asking, what are you going to do to get our kids back to school?” Amy Henry of East Cobb said to a noisy crowd of several hundred in the civic center’s parking lot.

“Do you know what Cobb County has told us? Nothing!” she went on, shouting into a microphone while standing in the bed of a pickup truck draped with an American flag. “There’s no transparency because they don’t have a plan. They have no intention of getting the kids back in school!”

When Henry told the crowd that some parents were abandoning Cobb’s high-quality public schools for private education because of online-only classes,

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Canada’s travel rules unfair to first-year foreign students, U.S. parents say

jhon yudha

WASHINGTON — Parents of students in the United States who hoped to begin their university studies in Canada this fall are frantically trying to convince the federal government to relax rules that make it next to impossible for their kids to enter the country.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada has closed the door to students with study permits granted after March 18, the day Canada and the U.S. announced a ban on non-essential cross-border travel, while students with pre-existing valid permits will be allowed in.

Some parents say that discriminates against first-year students, most of whom didn’t have time to get their permits approved before the deadline after receiving an offer of acceptance from Canadian schools.

“The way things are right now, the only ones that are not able to come into Canada are the freshmen, and that makes no sense to anyone,” said Anna Marti, a resident of New

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parents turn to private schooling amid coronavirus

<span>Photograph: John Moore/Getty Images</span>
Photograph: John Moore/Getty Images

Elyssa Katz, a Santa Monica mother of three, is growing a matchmaking service to connect families with tutors, or “Zutors”, as she calls them – a word she’s in the process of trademarking.

“The role of a Zutor is a tutor, a nanny, and an angel for a parent,” Katz told the Guardian, someone who can take over parental demands, help children with online homework and take them outside when it’s time for “recess”.

Katz’ clients range from the rich and famous, to everyday people who need childcare because they can’t look after their children while they have to work. Katz said she’s gotten calls from parents as far away as the Hamptons.

For a matchmaking fee that can range from $700 to $1,000 (£549 to £785), Katz and her team will interview tutor candidates, run background and reference checks, then match them to the right

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Parents rush to hire tutors and create learning pods. But not everyone has options

Luna Tringale, 6, sister Anaya Tringale, 5, father Rolando Tringale and mother Kamren Curiel are preparing for school to resume next month. <span class="copyright">(Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Luna Tringale, 6, sister Anaya Tringale, 5, father Rolando Tringale and mother Kamren Curiel are preparing for school to resume next month. (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

The advertisements started popping up on social media almost immediately after Los Angeles Unified School District said campuses would remain closed for the start of the school year due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We’re looking for a TA/College student to help with LAUSD’s virtual learning for the new school year. Parents are WFH. Kids are 5th, 3rd and potentially K. We’re starting a learning pod with another family. Any TA’s on the westside … looking for work?”

“ISO: Teacher/Tutor for 2nd grader and a little Kinder if possible. Would be open to hosting a very small pod in our back yard.”

“I am looking for a TA or tutor to help facilitate remote learning with my twin 1st graders and my 5th

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Day cares welcome mask-wearing toddlers as parents struggle to ‘make best decision’ in COVID-19 world

Sam DeRoze is almost 4 years old. After years of nanny care, he’s supposed to dive into his first organized school experience this fall. But the coronavirus pandemic has his mother mulling.

“I’ll need to see the plan from his preschool before I decide,” says Dianne DeRoze, a business consultant in Leesburg, Virginia. “If it’s safe and a positive experience, that’s valuable. What I don’t want is for him to have a knee-jerk reaction that school is this scary place you get dumped.”

DeRoze is among the millions of parents grappling with sending their children to preschool and babies to day care as cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, spike nationally.

The debate continues to rage among politicians and school officials on fall reopening plans. New York Mayor Bill de Blasio announced last week that the city would be providing day care for 100,000 children to help

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Daycares welcome mask-wearing toddlers as parents struggle to ‘make best decision’ in COVID-19 world

Sam DeRoze is almost 4 years old. After years of nanny care, he’s supposed to dive into his first organized school experience this fall. But the coronavirus pandemic has his mother mulling.

“I’ll need to see the plan from his pre-school before I decide,” says Dianne DeRoze, a business consultant in Leesburg, Virginia. “If it’s safe and a positive experience, that’s valuable. What I don’t want is for him to have a knee-jerk reaction that school is this scary place you get dumped.”

DeRoze is among millions of parents grappling with the pros and cons of sending their children to preschool and babies to day care as cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, spike nationally.

The debate continues to rage between politicians and school officials on fall re-opening plans, while New York Mayor Bill de Blasio announced last week that the city would be providing day care

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Are you worried about your elderly parents? 8 tips to help seniors stay mentally acute in isolation

Fitness coordinator Janet Hollander leads session of Balcony Boogie from outside Willamette Oaks in Eugene, Ore. for residents isolated in apartments during pandemic, April 21, 2020.
Fitness coordinator Janet Hollander leads session of Balcony Boogie from outside Willamette Oaks in Eugene, Ore. for residents isolated in apartments during pandemic, April 21, 2020.

Just what we need: Another reason to fear and loathe COVID-19.

If your loved ones are old, ill and confined to an assisted living or senior care home, you already know they are especially vulnerable to the killer virus, as the devastating death statistics in nursing homes attest. 

But you might not realize the efforts to protect them by isolating them has potentially dangerous consequences, too.

This became alarmingly obvious to Mary Ann Sternberg after her longtime partner, Ron, a retired psychologist who has Parkinson’s disease, was confined to the grounds along with the rest of the residents of his high-quality assisted living community in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, after they all went into lockdown in March. 

The residents couldn’t go out and their relatives

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Amid school reopening uncertainty, affluent parents hire private tutors

Sara Elahi isn’t waiting to find out whether her children’s schools will reopen in the coming months.

After an extensive interview process of several candidates, she found a private educator who will be going to her home to professionally home-school her two children during the first semester.

“Education is the most important thing to our family,” she said. “My kids need to have in-person instruction to really learn and absorb material, and, by no fault of their own, I can’t rely on the school to provide that.”

Elahi, a consultant in the Baltimore area, said that although the costs were high, she and her husband, a pharmacist, were willing to dip into their savings to provide their children with an “undisrupted education.”

“In our minds, it will be a long-term investment for our kids,” she said. “If they fall too behind in all the shuffle, they’ll be playing catch-up forever.”

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6 Ways Parents Can Deal With The Anxiety Of Remote Learning … Again

When schools around the country abruptly stopped in-person learning last fall, many parents had one endpoint in mind: September. We’d slog through the Zoom classes and meltdowns and clinginess, push through the summer, and by the time fall rolled around, we’d be able to send our children back to school and reclaim some level of normality.

But recently a growing number of major school districts, from Los Angeles to Houston, have announced plans to start the new academic year online. New York City has said children will be in the classroom, at most, three days a week. 

For some parents, the extension of online learning into the fall, as the coronavirus pandemic rages on, is a relief.

For others, it is devastating — and for many, it is a bit of both. 

“It is an impossible situation,” said Annie Snyder, a senior learning scientist at McGraw-Hill. “There is no good

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