Parents

Ontario urges parents to be prepared for every school scenario, mulls Stage 3 reopening

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As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 106,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and more than 8,700 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

July 9

1:50 p.m.: Ontario education minister still asking parent to prepare for three different schooling options for September

After

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Aunt of boy, 11, who died in ATV accident warns parents: ‘It was horrifying’

For many families, Fourth of July means enjoying outdoor activities together, and even though it’s a time to celebrate, taking precautions to protect your kids is still paramount.

That’s why Kristen Almer, whose 11-year-old nephew died in an all-terrain vehicle (ATV) accident in 2013, is calling on parents this weekend — and year round — to teach their kids about power sports safety.

According to a Consumer Federation of America report from 2018, July is the month with the most fatalities due to off-highway vehicles (OHVs), and the date with the highest number of fatalities is July 4.

Logan Almer’s story

On May 24, 2013, heading into Memorial Day weekend, Logan Almer, who lived with his father, mother and older brother in Minong, Wisconsin, got on his dad’s ATV when no adults were around, Almer told TODAY. He wasn’t wearing a helmet or other protective gear and drove the vehicle

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An economist who collected coronavirus data from 841 childcare centers explains how parents should decide whether to send kids back to school

reopening schools
reopening schools

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  • As cities start opening up, parents face the tough decision of whether to send children who’ve been stuck at home for months to daycare, or school. 

  • To help parents with that decision, Emily Oster, an economist, collected coronavirus data from childcare centers that have stayed open during the pandemic. 

  • The data pointed to low transmission rates among both children and staff.

  • Still, Oster acknowledged that the childcare decision is a personal one and that there are “no easy answers.”

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Since the pandemic hit, Emily Oster — an economist who’s authored two books on parenting and pregnancy— has been using available data to respond to families’ pressing concerns about the coronavirus. She’s touched on topics like how to safely visit grandparents and the risks the virus poses in pregnant women.

Lately, Oster’s received an outpouring of questions from parents about whether to

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Parents and kids hate online learning, but they could face more of it

In his suburban New Jersey home-turned-classroom this spring, parent Don Seaman quickly found himself in the role of household vice principal.

While his wife holed up in the bedroom to work each day, Seaman, a media and marketing professional, worked from the family room where he could supervise his children’s virtual learning. A similar scene played out in millions of American homes after schools shuttered and moved classes online to contain the coronavirus.

Now that the year’s over, Seaman has strong feelings about the experience: Despite the best efforts of teachers, virtual learning didn’t work. At least not uniformly, if his three children in elementary, middle and high school are any indication.

“The older kids were saying ‘This is hell,'” Seaman said. “My kids feel isolated, and they can’t keep up, and they’re struggling with it.”

But like it or not, remote instruction and virtual learning are likely to continue

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Parents and kids hate online classes. Going back to school likely will include more of it.

In his suburban New Jersey home-turned-classroom this spring, parent Don Seaman quickly found himself in the role of household vice principal.

While his wife holed up in the bedroom to work each day, Seaman, a media and marketing professional, worked from the family room where he could supervise his children’s virtual learning. A similar scene played out in millions of American homes after schools shuttered and moved classes online to contain the coronavirus.

Now that the year’s over, Seaman has strong feelings about the experience: Despite the best efforts of teachers, virtual learning didn’t work. At least not uniformly, if his three children in elementary, middle and high school are any indication.

“The older kids were saying, ‘This is hell,'” Seaman said. “My kids feel isolated, and they can’t keep up, and they’re struggling with it.”

But like it or not, remote instruction and virtual learning are likely to continue

Read More

Miami leaders have a few models for reopening schools. It’s up to parents to decide.

Miami-Dade County Public Schools’ plans keep shifting as coronavirus cases continue to spike exponentially.

The school district was due to announce its plan to reopen schools for the 2020-21 school year on Wednesday but postponed to squeeze in one more meeting with its work group of medical professionals and community members. The full plan will be presented at a special School Board meeting Wednesday, July 1.

“After the last Zoom call, as a parent, grandparent, I was extremely nervous and upset,” said Eileen Segal of the Family & Community Involvement Advisory Committee on Wednesday. “After listening today I feel a lot calmer.”

On Friday, the 23-member work group met virtually again to go over a revised draft plan. Seven models of how instruction would take place were whittled to four: A daily attendance at the schoolhouse model with reduced class sizes and social distancing; two hybrid models of in-person and

Read More

Miami officials have a few models for reopening schools. It’s up to parents to decide.

Miami-Dade County Public Schools’ plans keep shifting as coronavirus cases continue to spike exponentially.

The school district was due to announce its plan to reopen schools for the 2020-21 school year on Wednesday but postponed to squeeze in one more meeting with its work group of medical professionals and community members. The full plan will be presented at a special School Board meeting Wednesday, July 1.

“After the last Zoom call, as a parent, grandparent, I was extremely nervous and upset,” said Eileen Segal of the Family & Community Involvement Advisory Committee on Wednesday. “After listening today I feel a lot calmer.”

On Friday, the 23-member work group met virtually again to go over a revised draft plan. Seven models of how instruction would take place were whittled to four: A daily attendance at the schoolhouse model with reduced class sizes and social distancing; two hybrid models of in-person and

Read More

Why It Is Possible and Okay for Parents to Teach Their Own Kids

Click here to read the full article.

High school-educated, working-class parents aren’t capable of overseeing their own child’s education, a state lawmaker said last week.

New Hampshire state Sen. Jeanne Dietsch, D-Peterborough, made the comment at a committee hearing last Tuesday while promoting a bill that would stop the state Board of Education from creating a new way of allocating high school graduation credits.

“This idea of parental choice, that’s great if the parent is well-educated. There are some families that’s perfect for. But to make it available to everyone? No. I think you’re asking for a huge amount of trouble,” Dietsch said.

Dietsch’s remarks represent a growing trend among leftist politicians to belittle, even vilify, a parent’s role. The trend stems from an ideology that insists the nanny state is superior to parents.

Dietsch’s political commentary was a full-on attack on parental rights and education in America, with a

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Why Parents Shouldn’t Be Too Worried If Their Teen Can’t Put Their Phone Down Right Now

Click here to read the full article.

You don’t have to be a social psychologist to notice that daily life has been altered pretty drastically for people of all ages bringing many of us even closer with our devices. But for tech-obsessed teenagers, whose non-tech activities — school days, sports, and social outings — have been largely taken away, the result has been even more screen time. (That’s on top of the seven hours a day teens tend to spend on screens, to begin with).

“This pandemic has definitely challenged normal adolescent development, which is centered on having experiences that develop your identity separate from your family’s and adolescent peer socialization,” says Hina J. Talib, M.D., program director of the post-doctoral fellowship in adolescent medicine at Children’s Hospital at Montefiore.

More from SheKnows

And while today’s tech (think: Zoom, TikTok, Instagram, online classes) does provide social connection, if you’re

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