Medical clinic opens in Central High School | Western Colorado

jhon yudha

Representatives from School District 51 and MarillacHealth visited Central High School on Friday to celebrate the opening of the district’s first school- based health center.

The need for the medical clinic was identified after several teen suicides in 2017 and a report from Colorado Health Institute, which pinpointed three District 51 schools as having at-risk school populations, according to a release from District 51.

An advisory committee was formed to study the issue. It held several focus groups and sought input from families. Ultimately, a school-based health center was recommended.

“I cannot say how proud we are,” said Dr. Jolene Joseph, chief operating officer for MarillacHealth. “The partnerships and really the collegial efforts that we’ve had across the community, the collaboration has been amazing. We’ve had a number of partners at the table literally for two years.”

MarillacHealth will operate the clinic, which was constructed with grant funding, and will

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Tri-Valley School Donations May Be Curtailed By Coronavirus

TRI-VALLEY, CA — Only one thing is certain about the Tri-Valley’s upcoming school year, and that’s uncertainty.

With the coronavirus being far from under control, school officials have been debating when, or if, classrooms will reopen in the fall and, more importantly, how California’s economic crisis will ultimately impact the bottom line on budgets already stretched to the limit and largely dependent on revenue from the state.

Also impacted will be the flow of what has been millions of dollars donated by an extensive network of Tri-Valley nonprofit organizations, money used to supplement the increasing costs of educational activities.

During the 2016, 2017 and 2018 school years alone, nearly 80 individual tax-exempt nonprofit organizations provided some $40 million to the region’s four school districts — San Ramon Valley Unified, Dublin Unified, Pleasanton Unified and Livermore Valley Unified.

Chief among these benefactors is the San Ramon Valley Education Fund (SRVEF) based

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Your kids could get the coronavirus when they go back to school. These are the risks and benefits to weigh before sending them.

school coronavirus
school coronavirus

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  • Parents are weighing the coronavirus-related risks of sending their kids to school against the education and social losses of keeping them home. 

  • Kids are generally less susceptible to severe illness than adults, but it’s still possible for them to be infected. 

  • Keeping your child home could negatively impact their mental health and delay their social and educational development. 

  • The prevalence of the virus in your community and your school’s plans for controlling the virus also matter. 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

This was supposed to be Vanessa Wingerath’s “golden year.” For the first time, her three young children would all be in school, and the Tucson-based doula would have more time to focus on herself and career.  

Then the coronavirus pandemic hit, and sending kids to school was no longer a given. 

Sending only one or two kids to school could topple the family dynamic. Keeping

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Back to school? Despite CDC recommendations, most major schools going online as COVID-19 cases spike

As COVID-19 cases rise in most states, the prospect of in-person learning this fall at the country’s major school districts is becoming increasingly remote.

So far, nine of the top 15 school systems by enrollment plan to start the fall semester online, with two more currently planning a hybrid of in-person and online classes, according to Education Week magazine’s reopening tracker. Other top districts shifted school schedules later, hoping for cases to decline or for teachers and administrators to have more time to plan for the school year. 

As back-to-school season approaches, it’s highly likely the majority of big districts will start learning remotely while they work out plans for socially distant reopenings, said Annette Anderson, deputy director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Safe and Healthy Schools.

The biggest factor: whether the community where the school is located is seeing infection rates decrease, said Kristi Wilson, superintendent of the

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Why My Kids Won’t Be Returning To School Yet

It’s consuming every mother—every parent—I know. This decision we’ve never had to make before, and never expected we’d be forced to make. Most of us aren’t teachers. We don’t want to homeschool. We work full or part time or have a sea of babies and toddlers under our feet and have no idea how we’ll manage this continuation of e-learning/at-home learning. And yet we can’t fathom sending our kids into the unpredictable COVID-19 petri dish that schools will inevitably be.

So we turn to experts for advice. What do does the medical community recommend we do? What are they doing with their own children? Maybe if we do enough research or read enough articles or talk to enough experts, our path will become clear and we’ll know what the right choice is. Or maybe we’ll still continue to fumble through this fog, not knowing what’s right, praying we’re making the

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private Zoom tutors spark controversy as virtual school year looms

<span>Photograph: John Moore/Getty Images</span>
Photograph: John Moore/Getty Images

Elyssa Katz, a Santa Monica mother of three, is growing a matchmaking service to connect families with tutors, or “Zutors”, as she calls them – a word she’s in the process of trademarking.

“The role of a Zutor is a tutor, a nanny, and an angel for a parent,” Katz told the Guardian, someone who can take over parental demands, help children with online homework and take them outside when it’s time for “recess”.

Katz’s clients range from the rich and famous, to everyday people who need childcare because they can’t look after their children while they have to work. Katz said she had gotten calls from parents as far away as the Hamptons.

For a matchmaking fee that can range from $700 to $1,000 (£549 to £785), Katz and her team will interview tutor candidates, run background and reference checks, then match them to the

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Ontario finalizing fall school plans with goal to put kids back in class five days a week

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 112,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and nearly 8,800 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

July 23

2:10 p.m.: Details on Ontario’s school plan to come next week

Ontario’s Minister of Education Stephen Lecce teased that

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As the School Year Approaches, Education May Become the Pandemic’s Latest Casualty

Children tumble off a yellow school bus, where every other seat is marked with caution tape. Wearing whimsical masks—one has whiskers, another rhinestones—they wait to get their temperatures checked before filing into the one-story school building. Inside Wesley Elementary in Middletown, Conn., plastic shields rise from desks, and cartoon posters exhort children to cover your cough. In the middle of a lesson, teacher Susan Velardi picks up her laptop and pans it so her students can see the screen. “Look,” she tells them, “I have a friend that’s joining us at home!”

There’s a new set of ground rules in Velardi’s classroom. “Your mask is on, and your mask stays like this. If we go outside if it’s nice, we have to sit apart,” she tells the students, who will enter third grade in the fall. When one tries to high-five her, she compromises with an “air high five.” Other

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Back to school? Most major schools are heading toward online class as COVID-19 cases spike

As COVID-19 cases rise in most states, the prospect of in-person learning this fall at the country’s major school districts is becoming increasingly remote.

As of late Wednesday, 11 of the top 15 school systems by enrollment were already either planning to start the fall semester online or in a hybrid of in-person and online classes, according to Education Week magazine’s reopening tracker. Still other top districts have shifted school schedules later, hoping for cases to decline or for teachers and administrators to have more time to plan for the school year. 

As back-to-school season approaches, it’s highly likely the majority of big districts will start learning remotely while they work out plans for socially distant reopenings, said Annette Anderson, deputy director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Safe and Healthy Schools.

The biggest factor: whether the community where the school is located is seeing infection rates decrease, said Kristi

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Pfizer hopes for October vaccine OK as US orders 100M doses; CDC director ‘absolutely’ wants grandkids back in school

The U.S. government has placed an initial order for 100 million doses of a vaccine candidate being developed by Pfizer and a German firm, BioNTech, for $1.95 billion, the companies announced Wednesday.

The U.S. can acquire up to 500 million additional doses, the statement said.

Meanwhile, federal unemployment benefits are taking a hit at a time when more states are abruptly pausing their reopening plans. The $600 weekly jobless benefits bonus, approved in March, is about to expire and likely won’t be extended or replaced before next month.

The U.S. has been averaging more than 60,000 new cases daily for multiple weeks, and some states are seeing hospitalization rates soar. A USA TODAY analysis of Johns Hopkins data through late Tuesday shows 10 states set seven-day records for new cases while five states had a record number of deaths over the period.

📈 Today’s stats: The U.S. has more than

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