School

When will school open? Here’s a state-by-state list

When will schools open back up? How will schools open back up? Is there going to be school this year?

These are the questions on every parent’s mind these days. TODAY Parents has collected the latest information from every state and the largest school districts in every state. While some schools are planning to start the new school year with in-person instruction, many others are offering online options or a hybrid model. Please note: We’ll keep updating this story, but the situation is changing rapidly, so please check with your local school district for the latest.

Need help deciding what to do about school this year? See our story with expert advice on how to make the decision.

In the meantime, here’s what we know about schools re-opening this year:

Alabama

On June 26, State Superintendent Eric Mackey announced that all Alabama public schools should reopen on time. However, districts

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Here’s how to pick an online school next year

South Florida school options are diminishing almost daily. The pressure is mounting on parents to figure out how to make sure their kids get a quality education next year.

Palm Beach County schools will likely offer online-only instruction when the school year starts Aug. 10. Miami-Dade schools are also planning virtual-only learning to open the school year Aug. 24. Broward will make a decision on how to open schools in the coming weeks.

So what else is out there? There are private schools, some of which already have announced they will reopen for in-person classes, and charter schools, which are publicly funded but privately managed.

Then there are the public online schools that have been around for years, including Florida Virtual School and county-run virtual schools.

Decisions must be made soon. Some county virtual schools want applications by next week, while Florida Virtual’s deadline is July 31.

Here’s a primer

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B.C. urges country to keep borders closed, Ontario says school will look different

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 106,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and more than 8,700 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

July 9

5:15 p.m.: Quebec tightens measures for bars

The Quebec government is making changes to rules for bars after

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Ontario urges parents to be prepared for every school scenario, mulls Stage 3 reopening

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 106,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and more than 8,700 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

July 9

1:50 p.m.: Ontario education minister still asking parent to prepare for three different schooling options for September

After

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With No End in Sight to the Coronavirus, Some Teachers Are Retiring Rather Than Going Back to School

When Christina Curfman thought about whether she could return to her second-grade classroom in the fall, she struggled to imagine the logistics. How would she make sure her 8-year-old students kept their face masks on all day? How would they do hands-on science experiments that required working in pairs? How would she keep six feet of distance between children accustomed to sharing desks and huddling together on one rug to read books?

“The only way to keep kids six feet apart is to have four or five kids,” says Curfman, a teacher at Catoctin Elementary School in Leesburg, Virginia, who typically has 22 students in a class. Her district shut schools on March 12, and at least 55 staff members have since tested positive for the coronavirus. “Classrooms in general are pretty tight,” she says. “And then how do you teach a reading group, how do you teach someone one-on-one

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School District Opts To Reopen Schools, Make Face Masks Mandatory

TAMPA, FL — The Hillsborough County superintendent of schools has announced that students and staff returning to public schools on Aug. 10 will be required to wear face masks.

After meeting with health officials, business leaders, teachers and school administrators, Superintendent Addison Davis said he believes masks are the best option at this time for keeping students and staff safe from the spread of the coronavirus on campus.

The district will provide three reusable face coverings for each student on the first day of school and three reusable face coverings for each staff member during back-to-school pre-planning.

“The CDC has identified face masks as one of the most effective tools in stopping the spread of COVID-19,” Davis said. “I believe face coverings is the best option we have for providing additional protection for everyone on our campuses.”

He said the county has already acquired 760,000 masks through purchases and donations.

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Harvard Announces Plans for Students to ‘Learn Remotely’ for 2020-21 School Year with No Change in Tuition

Harvard University’s upcoming fall semester will look very different for students due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

On Monday, the Ivy League school announced that it will only allow 40 percent of its undergraduates onto its campus in Cambridge, Massachusetts, at the start of the academic year this fall. Those welcomed on school grounds include all first-year students and students “who must be on campus to progress academically.”

According to Harvard’s plan, first-year students will then “return home and learn remotely in the spring,” while seniors will be invited back on campus in early 2021 assuming that the school can maintain 40 percent density during the semester.

While all courses — including classes attended by students living in on-campus — will be taught online, the school said its tuition and fees will “remain as announced for the 2020-21 academic year.” (Currently, annual tuition costs $49,653 before fees and room and

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ICE Threatens to Deport Foreign Students if They’re Attending School via Zoom

Click here to read the full article.

Like other schools, colleges and universities are in the midst of finalizing their plans for how to educate students while protecting them from the novel coronavirus. Will they remain online only, invite all students back to campus, or provide a hybrid of the two approaches so that fewer students will crowd together in buildings? U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) just complicated matters for the many schools with foreign students enrolled.

Back when all campuses shut down in the spring, ICE temporarily suspended a rule for type F-1 (academic coursework) and M-1 (vocational coursework) nonimmigrant student visas that had previously limited the number of online classes students could take. On Monday, instead of simply extending that suspension, the agency announced that in order to stay in the U.S., students can take some but not all their courses online. If their school goes online-only,

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How one school district tends to students’ emotional health during coronavirus pandemic

SADDLE BROOK, N.J. — Three months ago, the Saddle Brook school district was making steady progress toward social and emotional learning as a part of a district initiative.

In-class yoga, mindfulness mantras and coping strategies for anxiety were part of the daily routine.

Then came the pandemic.

Virtual learning separated children from schoolmates and teachers at a time when the National Alliance on Mental Illness and other health experts were noting a surge in stress and depression. Next came the killing of George Floyd and racial tensions that heightened anxiety for many families. 

“I’m glad that we were in front of social and emotional learning, that we had this wellness initiative in place, because we had already been talking about it and doing it,” said Superintendent Danielle Shanley.

To address a complicated new reality, the entire faculty worked together to keep social and emotional learning at the forefront.  

“My concern

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An economist who collected coronavirus data from 841 childcare centers explains how parents should decide whether to send kids back to school

reopening schools
reopening schools

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  • As cities start opening up, parents face the tough decision of whether to send children who’ve been stuck at home for months to daycare, or school. 

  • To help parents with that decision, Emily Oster, an economist, collected coronavirus data from childcare centers that have stayed open during the pandemic. 

  • The data pointed to low transmission rates among both children and staff.

  • Still, Oster acknowledged that the childcare decision is a personal one and that there are “no easy answers.”

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Since the pandemic hit, Emily Oster — an economist who’s authored two books on parenting and pregnancy— has been using available data to respond to families’ pressing concerns about the coronavirus. She’s touched on topics like how to safely visit grandparents and the risks the virus poses in pregnant women.

Lately, Oster’s received an outpouring of questions from parents about whether to

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