Canada’s travel rules unfair to first-year foreign students, U.S. parents say

jhon yudha

WASHINGTON — Parents of students in the United States who hoped to begin their university studies in Canada this fall are frantically trying to convince the federal government to relax rules that make it next to impossible for their kids to enter the country.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada has closed the door to students with study permits granted after March 18, the day Canada and the U.S. announced a ban on non-essential cross-border travel, while students with pre-existing valid permits will be allowed in.

Some parents say that discriminates against first-year students, most of whom didn’t have time to get their permits approved before the deadline after receiving an offer of acceptance from Canadian schools.

“The way things are right now, the only ones that are not able to come into Canada are the freshmen, and that makes no sense to anyone,” said Anna Marti, a resident of New

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Students in Chesapeake’s specialized programs push district for online option

As Chesapeake Public Schools works to figure out what the fall will look like, some students said one provision in the city’s reopening plan effectively forced them to return to the classroom.

They started an online petition that garnered hundreds of signatures this week, met with principals, program coordinators and top district officials in zoom calls and made an appearance on the local NPR affiliate.

On Friday, the school district said it is adjusting the language shared on a return-to-school plan for high school students enrolled in programs like International Baccalaureate at Oscar Smith, Governor’s STEM Academy at Grassfield and the Science and Medicine Academy at Deep Creek.

At first, students and families were told they’d need to choose the in-person option to remain enrolled.

But in interviews, the district says those students will be allowed to remain in their academies without losing a spot if they choose to learn

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ICE bans international students from entering U.S. for online classes

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced on Friday that international students who plan to solely enroll in online classes this fall will be barred from entering the country. The announcement came as the U.S. topped 4 million coronavirus cases and as colleges and universities roll out plans to shift to online learning for the fall semester.

“Nonimmigrant students in new or initial status after March 9 will not be able to enter the U.S. to enroll in a U.S. school as a nonimmigrant student for the fall term to pursue a full course of study that is 100 percent online,” ICE said in its press release.

The department also mandated that designated school officials are not to provide new international students with an I-20 form that declares their legal student status. This guidance includes new international students who are outside of the U.S. and want to take online-only classes

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New foreign students can’t enter US if courses online

A week after revoking sweeping new restrictions on international students, federal immigration officials on Friday announced that new foreign students will be barred from entering the United States if they plan to take their classes entirely online this fall.

In a memo to college officials, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement said new students who were not already enrolled as of March 9 will “likely not be able to obtain” visas if they intend to take courses entirely online. The announcement primarily affects new students hoping to enroll at universities that will provide classes entirely online as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

International students who are already in the U.S. or are returning from abroad and already have visas will still be allowed to take classes entirely online, according to the update, even if they begin instruction in-person but their schools move online in the face of a worsening outbreak.

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Methacton Offering Students On Premise And Online Options

EAGLEVILLE, PA — Methacton School District tentatively plans to have an in-person schooling option this fall, part of a dual option plan which also offers families and students the choice of taking classes online.

The announcement comes as Montgomery County officials recently issued their countywide school reopening guidelines, which require masks and discourage large gatherings, field trips and extracurricular activities.

Methacton’s reopening plan includes an Aug. 31 start date. All students and staff must wear a face covering in schools, unless they are seated at desks that are six feet apart. This, however, will not always be possible.

“While some health organizations recommend 6’ distance for grades K -12, it may not be practical for students 100% of the school day,” the district notes in their plan.

Otherwise, face coverings can only be removed outdoors when social distancing is possible, while eating and drinking in a socially distanced manner, and

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Betsy DeVos just crossed another line. She’s an ongoing danger to teachers and students.

As much of the country experiences an alarming surge of COVID-19 cases, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos is carrying President Donald Trump’s water by demanding that states reopen their schools after the summer break. She makes this demand with no sense of how schools can do this safely. But just beneath her disregard for public health is a shocking ignorance about the fundamental nature of authority over public schools in this country. The secretary assumes she has that power and wants to run roughshod over those who do. In fact, shortly after making the demand, the governors of South Carolina, Iowa and Florida bowed to her assertion of authority, much to the dismay of educators in those states.

DeVos’ blanket demand that schools open is dangerous in its complete lack of consideration for student and teacher safety. She dismisses the risk of spreading COVID-19 among students, teachers and staff in school

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B.C. warning about ‘missteps’ leading to ‘significant resurgence,’ students in Alberta will return to school

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 110,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and nearly 8,800 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

July 21

7:15 p.m.: ‘A few missteps can quickly result is a significant resurgence’

A joint written statement from Adrian Dix,

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Missouri Gov. Says Students Who May Contract Coronavirus at School Are ‘Going to Get Over It’

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson insisted last week that students who may contract the novel coronavirus upon returning to school this fall are “going to get over it.”

“These kids have got to get back to school,” Parson, a Republican, said during a Friday interview with local radio station KFTK. “They’re at the lowest risk possible. And if they do get [coronavirus disease] COVID-19, which they will — and they will when they go to school — they’re not going to the hospitals. They’re not going to have to sit in doctor’s offices. They’re going to go home and they’re going to get over it.”

“We gotta move on,” Parson, 64, also said about COVID-19 during the interview. “We can’t just let this thing stop us in our tracks.”

The Centers for Disease Control & Prevention has reported that kids 17 or younger make up about 6 percent of confirmed U.S.

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Healdsburg Students May Have To Go Back To School Online

HEALDSBURG, CA — If Sonoma County is still on the state of California’s COVID-19 coronavirus watchlist when the fall semester begins, students of the Healdsburg Unified School District and all other school districts, charter schools and private schools in the county, will have to start the school year with online classes, according to back-to-school guidelines spelled out Friday by California Gov. Gavin Newsom.

Counties where schools are not able to start the 2020-2021 school year in physical classrooms must be taken off the watchlist and remain off the list for at least two weeks before students can return to on-campus learning, Newsom said.

In response to Newsom’s orders for California schools in the age of coronavirus, Sonoma County Superintendent of Schools Steve Herrington released a statement and said he would meet with Sonoma County’s 38 superintendents, as well as charter school and private school leaders, early next week to discuss

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Solano County Students To Start New School Year Online

SOLANO COUNTY, CA — As California Gov. Gavin Newsom laid out back-to-school guidelines for K-12 students across the state Friday, saying that students in counties on the state’s coronavirus monitoring list must start the school year online, the Solano County Office of Education confirmed all K-12 students in Solano County will start the school year with distance learning.

“Previously, some Solano County school districts and charter schools made plans to reopen school campuses with varying models of social distancing, modified schedules, and distance learning options for students,” SCOE Spokeswoman Jennifer Leonard said Friday in a news release.

“However, the newly issued orders require that schools located in counties on the state’s County Monitoring List must begin the school year with distance learning from home,” Leonard said. “Solano County is currently on the state’s County Monitoring List due to recent increased in COVID-19 cases.”

As to when students in Solano and

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