20 Ways GH Editors are Staying Sane While Sheltering at Home

Photo credit: courtesy
Photo credit: courtesy

From Good Housekeeping

The Good Housekeeping staff usually spends hours together devising fun crafts and cooking projects, home decor ideas and cleaning hacks, beauty tips and the best products for, well, everything. We get such joy out of working as a team and then sharing the results with you, our readers. And over the past few months, we’ve kept on keeping on – just from our separate abodes and living situations. Throughout our time sheltering at home, we’ve all had to get creative to keep ourselves and our families safe and entertained and to find a moment of sanity wherever and however we can. That looks different for everyone, just like our circumstances do, but we realized all of our techniques have one thing in common: They might be useful for others, too.

As many of us face an uncertain summer, we thought you might like a

Read More

6 ways to lower your blood sugar naturally

People with diabetes or those at risk should adopt a healthy lifestyle to lower blood sugar.
People with diabetes or those at risk should adopt a healthy lifestyle to lower blood sugar.

Igor Alecsander/Getty Images

High blood sugar occurs when your body cannot convert sugar in the blood to energy for cells. This is a common issue for those with diabetes, or those at risk. If you don’t lower your blood sugar, you will be at an increased risk for serious health complications such as heart disease, kidney disease, and vision loss. 

That’s why, if you already have diabetes, it’s important to frequently check your blood sugar to make sure your levels stay in a normal, healthy range. 

Plus, about one-third of Americans have prediabetes — or elevated blood sugar levels — and 84% of them don’t know they have it. If you have prediabetes, it’s also important to lower your blood sugar levels in order to reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. 

Here

Read More

6 Ways Parents Can Deal With The Anxiety Of Remote Learning … Again

When schools around the country abruptly stopped in-person learning last fall, many parents had one endpoint in mind: September. We’d slog through the Zoom classes and meltdowns and clinginess, push through the summer, and by the time fall rolled around, we’d be able to send our children back to school and reclaim some level of normality.

But recently a growing number of major school districts, from Los Angeles to Houston, have announced plans to start the new academic year online. New York City has said children will be in the classroom, at most, three days a week. 

For some parents, the extension of online learning into the fall, as the coronavirus pandemic rages on, is a relief.

For others, it is devastating — and for many, it is a bit of both. 

“It is an impossible situation,” said Annie Snyder, a senior learning scientist at McGraw-Hill. “There is no good

Read More

24 Ways To Make This Week’s Paycheck Go Further

With serious economic trouble looming, millions of potential workers applying for unemployment benefits and an entire country settling into a new and tense reality, it’s more important now to extend money’s purchasing power than it’s ever been. Here are some practical, doable and even fun ways to make the most of your money.

Last updated: April 6, 2020

Break Out the Coupons

Thanks to sites like Coupon Sherpa, Coupons.com and others, using coupons has never been easier and they can help you save money immediately. Right now, for example, you can save $1 on Coupons.com on both Clorox disinfecting mopping cloths and Scrubbing Bubbles bath cleaning products — good finds in a time when supplies of cleaning products are sparse and expensive.

Earn Money Through Your Credit Card

You can make your credit card pay you back by taking up your issuer on introductory offers. The PenFed Gold Visa®

Read More

Team Trump Frantically Plots New Ways to Make Him Feel Good About Himself

Photo Illustration by Kelly Caminero/The Daily Beast/Getty
Photo Illustration by Kelly Caminero/The Daily Beast/Getty

On Tuesday night, White House trade adviser Peter Navarro—whom Donald Trump affectionately calls “my Peter”—decided to dump gasoline on a simmering fire when he sent USA Today a statement that it published as an op-ed in which he slammed Dr. Anthony Fauci for standing in the way of “the president’s courageous decision” making on the COVID-19 pandemic.

Having just downplayed the significance of anti-Fauci talking points that they themselves had sent to media outlets, members of the White House press office were left, once again, to repair the residual damage, insisting that the USA Today opinion piece didn’t go through the “normal White House clearance processes.”

But the fact that Navarro didn’t get official clearance for his statement was largely an irrelevant point. After all, he didn’t need it. According to three individuals familiar with the matter, in the past few months Trump

Read More

4 effective ways to make your virtual workplace more inclusive

Let’s be honest: pre-pandemic, working from home was a dream. After COVID-19 forced almost everyone to work remotely, we’ve discovered the new virtual workplace encompasses more than Zoom calls, virtual coffees, and cat memes in Slack.

Tech companies did not exactly embrace working from home before the worldwide lockdown, despite studies showing working from home increases employee productivity. Skilled remote workers are also happier employees that are 9% more engaged and 50% less likely to quit their job.

The crisis disproved the perception that working from home was counterproductive. By mid-May, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey emailed his employees that the entire workforce was allowed to permanently work from home – Slack followed suit in June. Google, Amazon, Facebook, and Microsoft recommended their employees work remotely until October or for the remainder of the year.

Work-life balance, mental health, and diversity and inclusion were already important subjects

Read More

The 7 worst ways Americans are using their tax refunds

Because of COVID-19, this year’s tax deadline got delayed three months to July 15. But even with the extra time, it appears many people are still waiting until the last minute to file — including many taxpayers who will be receiving refunds.

The IRS says that as of July 3, it processed 95 million refunds, down from 105 million by the same time last year.

The tax agency says Americans are getting back an average $2,762 this year, slightly more than during the 2019 tax season.

With the economy struggling and unemployment still high, managing a refund wisely is more important than ever. But many Americans aren’t making the best use of their windfalls.

See the seven worst ways people are using their tax refunds.

1. Letting it rot in checking accounts

Prapan manuchon / Shutterstock

Setting a tax refund aside in an emergency fund is smart. Many financial

Read More

Best Ways To Sell Your Car During the Coronavirus Crisis

Thanks to the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic, life across the globe has turned upside down. Even formerly common activities, such as dining out or shopping for groceries, have become difficult to conduct safely in 2020. Selling a car is no exception, as the process generally involves close contact with a number of people. GOBankingRates came up with a list of safety precautions for you to consider so that you can still sell your car safely during the coronavirus crisis.

Last updated: July 9, 2020

Thoroughly Clean and Disinfect Your Car

No matter when you are selling your car, you should thoroughly clean and sanitize it before you show it to buyers. However, in the COVID-19 era, a thorough disinfection is required.

Not only will disinfecting keep both you and your potential buyers safe, it can also be used in your marketing ad. Certain buyers may be interested to know that you

Read More

4 Ways You Were Conditioned To Hate Fitness As A Kid

Years of viewing fitness as punishment can take some time to repair. (Photo: Getty Images/HuffPost)
Years of viewing fitness as punishment can take some time to repair. (Photo: Getty Images/HuffPost)

Experiences we have when we’re young are incredibly formative ― especially when it comes to something like exercise.

Fitness isn’t just physical; it also has a major effect on the mind. If you have a positive outlook on it (or even just a tolerable one), the likelihood is pretty good that exercise will improve your mental health. But if you’ve had negative emotions about working out in the past, chances are that moving your body can cause more stress than you may even think is worth it.

Part of that stems from how you may have thought about exercise when you were young. There are a handful of subtle ways we can be conditioned to hate fitness as kids. Below are just a few of them:

Mandated School Fitness Tests And Curriculum

Requiring students to

Read More

6 ways to motivate and inspire your employees that don’t involve a pay rise

Modern companies offer a lot of perks for employees: healthy breakfasts and fruits, medical insurance, massage right in the office, a gym with personal fitness coaches, and much more. Due to recent quarantine guidelines, most companies had to stop all office activities and move some of them online, such as training and fitness classes.

Even if you have a budget for perks, tangible and intangible methods of motivation should work together. People need to know that their work matters. Perks are great for attracting people, but they have a lesser effect on retaining them.

It’s critical to understand one fundamental thing though: benefits will not replace salary. A person works for money, having all the rest is good but secondary.

However, if pay cuts are needed due to the crisis, there are ways to retain and motivate your employees, as well as preserve high efficiency. Based on my experience of

Read More