How screen time affects your skin

© Bartek Szewczyk/Westend61/Cover Images With many of us working from home and having to use technology to keep in touch with colleagues, bosses and friends, we are spending infinitely more time on our devices. While we know spending hours looking at a laptop and/or phone, particularly from a makeshift desk […]



a woman sitting at a table using a laptop computer


© Bartek Szewczyk/Westend61/Cover Images


With many of us working from home and having to use technology to keep in touch with colleagues, bosses and friends, we are spending infinitely more time on our devices.

While we know spending hours looking at a laptop and/or phone, particularly from a makeshift desk set-up, can cause eye strain and “tech neck” – tension in the back and neck from looking down at devices – did you realise it also has an impact on the skin over time?

Alice Moore, Facialist and founder of skincare brand Kyushi, has explained to us the ways in which screen time can affect our skin.

Blue light damage

“The blue light emitted from our devices can, over time, contribute to hyperpigmentation and photoageing, which will show in the skin as brown spots, lines and wrinkles,” warns Alice. “Topical antioxidants are a must to prevent blue light damage – ingredients like Vitamins E and C are able to protect the skin from oxidative damage from free radicals.”

Lines and wrinkles

“Straining the eyes is not only bad for your overall eye health, but the constant squinting can lead to lines and wrinkles as well as fluid build-up under the eyes,” she explains. “A Gua Sha massage is a wonderful way to move the fluid build-up in the face down into the lymphatic system to be removed by the body.”

Puffiness

“Looking downwards for long periods of time, especially with rounded shoulders, will also reduce the lymphatic flow, this is what helps to drain from excess fluid and toxins from our face,” the expert says, recommending Kyushi’s Power of Ten facial oil. “After a day of screen time, self-massage will help to get your blood flowing and aid lymphatic drainage to avoid a puffy face and jowly neck and jaw.”

Tired skin

“Blue light disrupts the body’s natural circadian rhythm (internal body clock) especially when working from a laptop, our phones or watching TV late at night,” she explains. “This reduces the amount of melatonin (sleep hormone) we produce, which is a strong anti-inflammatory, helps to boost our immune system and our bodies’ ability to detoxify. Poor sleep can therefore lead to inflamed, puffy, dull and congested skin.”

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