Blog Archive

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The U.S. isn’t merely failing to deal with the coronavirus. We’re moving backward

One day recently I caught up with Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg, a veteran public health expert whom I had last interviewed in April about an article he had published setting forth a program to “crush” the coronavirus in 10 weeks.

I asked him how he thought the U.S. had fared in the intervening three months.

“Those were the days,” he sighed. “You could just put today’s date on the article and reprint it.”

‘People walked into the first lockdown with some trust that this would matter and their actions would make a difference. That proved not to be the case.’

David Eisenman, UCLA

That’s an indication of not only how little progress we’ve made against the pandemic, but how much time we have squandered.

Fineberg, who served as president of the Institute of Medicine (now the National Academy of Medicine) and dean of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public

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How The Coronavirus Has Affected What We Buy At The Grocery Store

As the major effects of the coronavirus pandemic make themselves apparent ― the ubiquity of masks and hand sanitizer, restaurants serving at half capacity ― other, more subtle changes are still just coming into focus.

Take the grocery store. Doorstep delivery and online shopping, already popular before COVID-19, have become part and parcel of a business model that once relied almost exclusively on brick-and-mortar stores. Moreover, the pandemic appears to have affected not just where and how we buy food, but what we’re actually eating.

Two simultaneous trends in our consuming habits are becoming clear. Many Americans are buying products they believe will boost their immune systems, in the hopes of fending off disease. At the same time, rising levels of anxiety and stress have pushed some to seek solace in the things they eat, resulting in an uptick in sales of comfort food. This raises the question: Will

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Hoboken Warns People About Gatherings And Gyms Amid Coronavirus

HOBOKEN, NJ — After noting Tuesday that the city of Hoboken had received confirmation of 12 new coronavirus cases since Friday, Mayor Ravi Bhalla said on Wednesday that the city had confirmed six more cases: “all between the ages of 25 and 45, and several were related to situations where residents attended social gatherings that took place during the July 4 weekend both within Hoboken and in areas across New Jersey.”

Bhalla has been encouraging residents who may have been exposed to the virus to get a test starting 5 to 7 days after exposure, for maximum accuracy. Thus, those exposed on July 4 weekend would be more likely to get positive test results over the past week. Bhalla has said that contact tracing and interviews with the Health Department helps determine where people have been.

The new numbers bring the total cases confirmed in the mile-square city to 640

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16 Real People Affected By the Coronavirus Give Their Best Financial Advice

The coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, has taken over the world. As of March 30, 2020, there were more than 770,000 cases and nearly 37,000 deaths reported worldwide. It has affected the young and old alike and turned daily life in nearly every country into a surreal nightmare.

From a financial point of view alone, it’s an extremely uncertain and stressful time. Millions of people are unable to work and yet still must pay rent, car payments, student loan debt and more. Buying groceries and other essentials has become a challenge for many, too, and not just because there isn’t enough toilet paper to go around.

However, this doesn’t mean there aren’t ways of getting through this pandemic. GOBankingRates spoke with 16 people around the world who have been affected by the coronavirus, from job losses to life-threatening health concerns, and asked them for their best financial advice. Learn what … Read More

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Report finds 61 per cent of women intend to be more active after coronavirus lockdown

Nearly two thirds of women intend to be more active after the coronavirus lockdown, sparking hope the gender gap in physical activity which has been exacerbated by the pandemic could be closed sooner than expected.

Exercise levels among women have declined at a much faster rate than men during the lockdown, which prompted initiatives such as Sport England’s ‘Join The Movement Campaign’ to help people stay active. 

Figures published by the body showed that 42 per cent of women have reported a drop in activity levels during the lockdown, compared to 35 per cent among men. 

New findings, however, published on Thursday from leading sports charity Women in Sport show nearly half (46 per cent) of women said that taking physical exercise has become more of a priority in their life during the lockdown.

A further 61 per cent of women also said that they will put more effort into

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A coronavirus mental health crisis is looming and we need more professionals to deal with it

A woman runs past a mental health mural on the Falls road in west Belfast: PA
A woman runs past a mental health mural on the Falls road in west Belfast: PA

Lockdown has been devastating for many people’s mental health and the worst could be yet to come. Leading mental health charities are exposing the breadth of the problem we face. Mind found that most adults with a pre-existing mental health problem said their mental health had become worse during lockdown. More than a fifth of adults with no previous experience of mental health problems before lockdown say that their mental health is now poor.

Other research indicates that 80 per cent of teenagers and young adults believe the pandemic has made their mental health worse. Overall, the Centre for Mental Health expects to see at least 500,000 more people experiencing mental ill-health if the economic effects of the pandemic mirror those of the 2008 banking crisis.

It’s clear that some of the biggest contributors

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Hoboken Gets $1.9M For Small Business, $8M For Coronavirus Care

HOBOKEN, NJ — U.S. Sen. Bob Menendez, Mayor Ravi Bhalla, and other officials announced on Wednesday that Hoboken small businesses can get $1.9 million in CARES Act funding, and that the city will also get $8 million for the city’s coronavirus expenses including testing, food for seniors, costs of disinfecting public buildings, and more. (Find out how to get a coronavirus test in Hoboken at the end of the story.)

Businesses affected by the crisis can apply for grants of up to $20,000 through a program administered by Hoboken and Hudson County.

Some small businesses and schools in Hoboken have already received federal PPP loans, which can be forgiven (see the list here). Others set up GoFundMe accounts for their staff at the beginning of the pandemic. But even those who’ve gotten PPP loans say they still have struggles. READ MORE: Here Are The Hoboken Businesses That Got PPP Loans.

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How Pooled Testing for Coronavirus Could Help Test More People in Less Time

As pandemic re-opening efforts show mixed success, across the U.S., there have been reports of long lines for COVID-19 testing, and shortages in some places. One solution could be pooled testing, a strategy that’s already been used in China, Germany, Israel and South Africa to test a large number of people in a short amount of time.

The idea is to get more out of each COVID-19 test by skimming off a small amount of material from each person’s sample, combining them into a single ‘sample’ and running the test on that. If the sample is negative, then there’s a good chance that all of the people who contributed to that sample are negative for COVID-19. If the pooled sample is positive, then technicians go back and test each sample separately to determine which one was positive.

Such a strategy is a sort of testing triage, and could save on

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Courts Will Need to Adapt to the Coronavirus Crush

(Bloomberg Opinion) — The time of coronavirus has been a time of reckonings — about the perils of political polarization, a diminished public sector and America’s unfinished project of civil rights. But there is a further reckoning that will soon play out, not in our hospitals, but in our courts: the legal system’s declining capacity to provide justice to ordinary Americans.

That reckoning begins in Michigan this week with the lifting of the moratorium pausing eviction cases, ordered by Governor Gretchen Whitmer in March as Covid-19 spread. When her order expires Thursday, Michigan’s courts are expecting a deluge of 75,000 eviction cases.

Michigan is not alone, and evictions are only the start. America’s courts will soon fill with millions of cases reflecting the failing finances and fraying relationships of our sheltered-in-place lives. Those cases will flood a court system already in crisis: chronically underfunded, technologically behind the curve and shockingly

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Will UConn play football this year? Public health experts unsure about fall sports during coronavirus pandemic

Currently, UConn football players are on campus in Storrs. They have been tested for COVID-19. They have passed through a modified quarantine period during which they remained in small groups. They have completed strength and conditioning workouts. They have begun on-field activities.

But no one knows for sure whether they’ll actually get to play.

Amid a raging pandemic, public health experts both nationally and in Connecticut have raised eyebrows about the idea of college sports this fall. Some say the games will be safe as long as schools implement proper protocols. Others wonder whether sports, particularly on college campuses, are worth the risk.

“We’re in the middle of a pandemic, and there is no way we can make the risk zero,” said Dr. Matthew Cartter, Connecticut’s state epidemiologist. “We have to ask ourselves as a society, are sports important that we’re willing to accept the risk that people involved in

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