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Rush Limbaugh Gets Extra Weird, References Cannibalism In Coronavirus Rant

Right-wing radio host Rush Limbaugh on Tuesday said cannibalism is just a way of adapting and that Americans had better adapt to the coronavirus. 

Limbaugh, who previously said the COVID-19 infection was just the common cold, called the response to the pandemic “un-American.” He also compared the situation to the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918-19, saying then-President Woodrow Wilson never mentioned it. 

“There was no national policy to deal with it,” Limbaugh said. “There was no shutdown, there was just, ‘Hey, go outside, get some fresh air, stand in the sun as long as you can, get some vitamin D, feel better.’”

Limbaugh didn’t mention that the pandemic killed 50 million people around the world, including 675,000 Americans, nor did he discuss the advances in science and medicine over the following century that inform today’s response. Instead, he said it was just one of the “things that happened to people

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Herndon Yoga Studio Slowly Adds New Classes Following Coronavirus

HERNDON, VA — Like many other small businesses in the Herndon community, The Health Advantage Yoga Center was hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic.

Susan Van Nuys, who has owned and operated the yoga studio at 1041 Sterling Road in Herndon since 2001, told Patch back in April her core business was walk-in traffic. That pretty much stopped when Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam ordered all non-essential businesses to close in March.

Just like other business owners, though, Van Nuys found a way to adapt and has managed to keep her business afloat through the state’s closure and the early stages of its phased reopening. Now that the state is in phase three, gyms and fitness centers can operate at 75 percent capacity, and recreational sports will have continued physical distancing requirements.

Van Nuys recently answered a few questions about how well her business has weathered the pandemic and the first

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Hoboken Reports 12 New Coronavirus Cases

HOBOKEN, NJ — Hoboken Mayor Ravi Bhalla said in an update on Tuesday afternoon that the mile-square city’s Health Department reported 12 new coronavirus cases from this past Friday through Sunday (four each day), and then none this past Monday and Tuesday. Hoboken, with 53,000 residents across the river from New York City, has had a total of 634 confirmed cases since March, and 29 deaths.

Bhalla said, “The majority of new COVID-19 cases reflect the trend across the rest of the country, with most under the age of 35. As always, the Health Department continues with diligent contact tracing on every confirmed case.”

He said, “In addition to the Health Department’s contact tracing, I ask all residents who test positive to follow up with your own contact tracing and urge anyone who may have been in contact with you to self-quarantine for a full 14 days and get tested

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‘A selfish mindset.’ Coronavirus cases spike among young adults in California, Sacramento

A growing majority of coronavirus cases in Sacramento County is being reported among young adults. And health officials think birthday parties and graduations may be to blame.

Members of the millennial and “Gen Z” generations – typically those under the age of 39 – make up more than half of Sacramento County’s coronavirus infections, data from local health officials show. The number of those infected in those age groups is on the rise: of the 2,379 new COVID-19 cases reported over the past 12 days in Sacramento, more than 1,400 — about 60 percent — have been in people under the age of 40.

Since the start of the pandemic, over 3,100 of the 5,938 people who’ve tested positive for the coronavirus in Sacramento County have been under 40, according to the county health department’s coronavirus dashboard.

The trend is also playing out in nearby counties. As of Monday, 61

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11 of the biggest myths about coronavirus, according to the World Health Organisation

Getty Images/iStockphoto
Getty Images/iStockphoto

Ever since the coronavirus pandemic began making headlines across the world, there has been confusing and sometimes conflicting advice. Should we wear masks, should we not; does wearing gloves help; can the virus be spread from pets to humans – the list goes on.

Despite the plethora of information about the Covid-19 outbreak, the main guidance has largely remained the same for several months, albeit with slight updates: maintain social distancing guidelines, wash your hands thoroughly and regularly, and isolate at home if you start exhibiting symptoms including a high fever; a new, continuous cough or a loss or changed sense of smell and taste.

Amid the guidelines issued by governments and health organisations, myths concerning the virus have also been spreading, making it difficult for some members of the public to discern truth from fiction.

On the website for the World Health Organisation (WHO), it lists some

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Can shopping malls survive the coronavirus pandemic and a new slate of permanent store closings?

Just when many shopping malls had finally figured out how to adapt to the era of digital retail, the coronavirus pandemic upended everything.

Having seen their recent move toward dining, entertainment, fitness and personal services come to a screeching halt – a pivot that was supposed to help them survive the Amazon age – malls throughout America are suddenly running out of time.

With J.C. Penney trying to avoid liquidation, smaller retailers closing or requesting rent relief, and venues like theaters still temporarily shut down due to COVID-19, anywhere from 1 in 4 malls to 1 in 2 could go out of business altogether, analysts projected.

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“The whole business model of a mall, which is about pulling in as many people as you can and getting them to stay for as long as you

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Coronavirus Outbreaks Linked to Fraternity Houses are a Warning for College Campuses

Recent coronavirus outbreaks have been linked to fraternities at universities in Washington, California and Mississippi, and experts say it’s an example of what’s to come as many colleges reopen for in-person classes beginning in August.

At least 136 fraternity house residents and nine other students at the University of Washington in Seattle had tested positive for COVID-19 as of July 10 in what officials called a “Greek Row outbreak.” It “provides lessons for students as they consider their return to campus this fall,” said Dr. Geoffrey Gottlieb, chair of the university’s Advisory Committee on Communicable Diseases.

Officials at the University of California, Berkeley, said Wednesday that a “concerning” spike of 47 new COVID-19 cases among students was linked to the school’s fraternities and sororities. The university is currently planning to open for limited in-person learning, bringing up to 6,500 students back to on-campus housing in August. But this outbreak could

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Thousands of Baltimore teens to start summer jobs Monday in YouthWorks program upended by coronavirus pandemic

When Kalen Jones worked as a patient advocate last summer, his job was what you’d expect: visit with sick and injured people, ask about their experiences and witness the hustle and bustle of a hospital from behind the scenes.

The 16-year-old will report Monday for another summer’s duty, one of 4,500 teens in Baltimore’s YouthWorks program. But this year, he and the other young people will navigate the unpredictable terrain of work life in the coronavirus era.

Kalen, a rising junior at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, said he does not know what to expect when he boots up his computer for his first remote shift at the University of Maryland Medical Center’s Midtown Campus.

“It has been a little complicated. But it is still a great opportunity I can take to prepare myself for the future,” said Kalen, who is thinking about a career as a surgeon.

While many cities, including

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Do children spread coronavirus? What doctors say about going back to school

President Donald Trump is pressing state and local officials to reopen schools this fall, despite coronavirus infections surging nationwide. While experts say there are significant social benefits to resuming in-person classes, they caution that schools will need to balance those against potential risks to provide a safe learning environment for students — as well as teachers and administrators.

Evidence suggests that children are not as susceptible as adults to COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. Even among those who have been infected, it’s relatively rare for children to develop serious complications or require hospitalization.

But this doesn’t mean classrooms can be exempt from social distancing and other safety precautions, particularly if schools intend to welcome kids back on site in less than two months.

“It really shouldn’t be a debate of getting kids back to school, but getting kids back to school safely,” said Dr. Jennifer Lighter, a pediatric

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How Ocado went from understated British grocer to an $18.4 billion tech giant, as the coronavirus pandemic confirms the future of grocery shopping is online

"Bots" are seen on the grid (or "The Hive") of Ocado's "smart platform" in Andover, Britain, on May 1, 2018.
“Bots” are seen on the grid (or “The Hive”) of Ocado’s “smart platform” in Andover, Britain, on May 1, 2018.

REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

  • As grocery stores worldwide experienced stockpiling, long lines, and health worries amid the coronavirus pandemic, millions of people turned to shopping online.

  • It has been a goldrush for the British company Ocado, an online-only grocery marketplace that also operates technology for supermarket giants worldwide.

  • Ocado was the best performing stock on the FTSE 100 in the second quarter of 2020, and, in May, Ocado raised over $1 billion to grow its services.

  • It is now betting big on its US expansion, hoping to convert Americans to grocery shopping online.

  • Huge challenges remain, though. Many Americans are still reluctant to buy food they can’t see in person, and some fear the current online pandemic-driven boom could prove a one-off.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The coronavirus pandemic

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