jobs

These Side Jobs Will Be the Most Popular in the US

Few times in American history has the “side gig” been as important as it is today. With many Americans suddenly discovering that their main gig wasn’t something they could continue to do safely in the midst of the pandemic, finding additional forms of employment is about more than a little extra spending money right now.

But what sort of potential side gigs stand to be the most rewarding — and the least risky — in the coming months? Using those side gigs that Americans rated as being the most popular in past surveys, GOBankingRates has produced this study that could indicate which of these jobs are likely to get a surge of interest based on the average wages and a very general assessment of its potential risks for contracting the coronavirus — though one should be careful to keep in mind that those risks can vary greatly depending on the … Read More

Millions Are Unemployed. Crises Abound. Is It Time To Guarantee Public Service Jobs?

“Is there a limit to how much we can care for each other?”

That’s the radical question at the heart of economist Pavlina Tcherneva’s timely new book, ”The Case for a Job Guarantee,” due to be published this month. 

The 128-page book went to print in December when the U.S. unemployment rate was near a postwar low of 3.5%. Yet that figure obscured the harsh realities of the economy it’s so often used to describe. Hallowed growth of the economy was less a rising tide than a wave that pummeled most and allowed a select few to surf. 

Average real incomes for the bottom 90% of families fell from 2009 to 2012, the first three years of the post-Great Recession recovery. By 2017, that average was 2.2% lower than in 1997. And as wages continued their decades-long stagnation, planet-heating emissions soared and storms and fires grew more

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How Bridge Jobs Can Help You Weather a Recession

At the start of 2020, things were looking pretty good for most job seekers.

Employers were striving to attract new workers — often one-upping one another with sweeter perks, higher pay and better benefits. Your New Year’s resolutions (remember those?) probably included a lofty career aspiration or two.

In a few short months, the coronavirus has wreaked havoc on the economy. More than 40 million Americans have lost work and filed for unemployment benefits.

That is not to say your career goals are no longer attainable — just that reality of the current job market needs to be factored into your game plan.

Jobs are out there. Certain industries have been booming throughout the pandemic. The jobs aren’t always glamorous, but, hey, they’re hiring. If you’re out of work, priority No. 1 is getting some money coming in.

Enter bridge jobs.

What Are Bridge Jobs?

Bridge jobs aren’t literal jobs

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Jobs That Make Social Distancing Difficult

Photo credit: izusek/istockphoto
Photo credit: izusek/istockphoto

Too Close for Comfort

The coronavirus pandemic has made “6 feet apart” a mantra for many, but what about workers whose livelihoods depend on contact with others? Economists with the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis examined data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and Department of Labor to quantify how tough it is to keep a safe distance in various occupations. They assigned a proximity index based on their findings, where 0 means workers can do their job very far from others, while 100 means the opposite. Here are the highest-contact careers where “social distancing” is little more than wishful thinking.

Related: Are You Required to Put Yourself in Harm’s Way? Know Your Rights When Returning to Work

Photo credit: wavebreakmedia/istockphoto
Photo credit: wavebreakmedia/istockphoto

Hair Stylists and Cosmetologists

Proximity Index: 92.17
It goes without saying that it’s hard to do hair and makeup without touching clients. Adding insult to

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Public health workers fighting COVID-19 are threatened, forced out of jobs

Emily Brown was stretched thin.

As the director of the Rio Grande County Public Health Department in rural Colorado, she was working 12- and 14-hour days, struggling to respond to the pandemic with only five full-time employees for more than 11,000 residents. Case counts were rising.

Full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak

She was already at odds with county commissioners, who were pushing to loosen public health restrictions in late May, against her advice. She had previously clashed with them over data releases and control and had haggled over a variance regarding reopening businesses.

But she reasoned that standing up for public health principles was worth it, even if she risked losing the job that allowed her to live close to her hometown and help her parents with their farm.

Then came the Facebook post: a photo of her and other health officials with comments about their weight and references

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‘I’ve applied for more than 100 jobs’

Kayleigh Rennix has never struggled to find work before. The HR manager from Essex was earning close to £40,000 working in the education sector before she resigned in March, fearing her role was at risk. Since then she’s applied for dozens of jobs, but has had little interest from employers.

“As my leaving date approached, coronavirus reared its ugly head. I would say I’ve applied for more than 100 jobs and not had many call-backs,” she says.

Kayleigh had planned to find a new job quickly and restart work in May, after a holiday in Italy.

But the coronavirus pandemic put paid to those plans. Now the 34-year-old has found herself relying on benefit payments for the first time in her life, and expects to move back in with her parents when her tenancy expires later in the summer.

“My rent is £900 a month and my universal credit is

Read More

‘I’ve applied for more than 100 jobs‘

Kayleigh Rennix has never struggled to find work before. The HR manager from Essex was earning close to £40,000 working in the education sector before she resigned in March, fearing her role was at risk. Since then she’s applied for dozens of jobs, but has had little interest from employers.

“As my leaving date approached, coronavirus reared its ugly head. I would say I’ve applied for more than 100 jobs and not had many call backs,” she says.

Kayleigh had planned to find a new job quickly and restart work in May, after a holiday in Italy.

But the coronavirus pandemic put paid to those plans. Now the 34-year-old has found herself relying on benefit payments for the first time in her life, and expects to move back in with her parents when her tenancy expires later in the summer.

“My rent is £900 a month and my universal credit

Read More