Day: June 14, 2020

Retailers welcome back customers after three months

Shops across England selling non-essential goods can welcome back customers on Monday for the first time in almost three months.

Retailers have had to introduce strict safety measures and the High Street experience will be very different to what shoppers are used to.

Amid fears about the health of the UK economy, getting a key part of the service sector running again is vital.

But retail experts warned shops were unlikely to see any immediate relief.

The unlocking comes as face coverings become compulsory when travelling on public transport in England from Monday. Children under the age of 11 will be exempt, and the rules might be waived for people who have a legitimate health reason for not wearing one.

Face coverings in shops will not be mandatory, with retailers hoping their introduction of an array of other safety measures will be sufficient.

Although food shops, pharmacies, banks and other

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New Study Shows Children Learn Better While Studying Outside

Click here to read the full article.

The coronavirus pandemic has disrupted the education of at least 1.5 billion school students. That’s more than 90% of the world’s children. Although many schools in the west, along with private schools in the developing world, have continued some school activities online, more than 50% of learners worldwide do not have a household computer. The absence of face-to-face learning and opportunities for playing with friends will have hugely impacted child mental health.

Countries are taking different approaches as to when, where and how to reopen schools, and some places are emphasising the benefits of outdoor learning.

Research has shown that an outdoor environment can improve children’s motivation and well-being, and can contribute to increasing children’s physical activity and learning outcomes. Learning in nature has been shown to reduce stress and boost mental well-being.

Outdoor learning was traditionally practised in countries across the African

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How much coronavirus risk is there in common travel activities? We asked an expert

Travel in the middle of a global pandemic presents challenges, with each activity carrying its own level of risk for coronavirus.

Joseph Khabbaza, a pulmonary and critical care physician at the Cleveland Clinic, said some of the biggest questions he’s getting relate to travel activities. 

Khabbaza, who treats coronavirus patients, said the primary path of transmission is contacts with respiratory droplets produced by infected people. Face masks, physical distancing, frequent hand-washing and cleaning and disinfecting of surfaces have become standard across the travel sector.  

“Every industry has interventions in place to make things safer,” he said.

The Cleveland Clinic has been helping United Airlines develop its coronavirus mitigation policies, including mandatory face masks, touchless kiosks and physical distancing.

“Companies are bringing in outside health experts,” Khabbaza said. “That can be a little bit reassuring.”

Khabbaza, who’s taking a 500-mile road trip with his family to Long Island, New York, offered

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Aloe vera producers are being squeezed as people make DIY hand sanitizer

Amidst the ongoing coronavirus crisis, Vicki Sherlock had a hard time finding hand sanitizer. 

She decided to make her own using rubbing alcohol, which she had in the cabinet, and aloe vera, a product that was alarmingly hard to find. 

“It’s DIY time,” Sherlock said as she browsed the internet for a bottle of aloe vera gel. The local Vitamin Shoppe sold out. Her neighborhood Target was out of stock. A nearby Walmart didn’t have any available for curbside pick up.

“I really didn’t think a basic bottle of aloe vera would be this difficult to locate,” Sherlock said. 

She’s among a wave of Americans seeking to make hand cleaners amidst a national shortage of select sanitary products. 

First, the pandemic created a scarcity of hand sanitizers at stores and online across the globe. Now, more people are resorting to the do-it-yourself method. And manufacturers of one of the key

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Consumers ‘should shop with confidence’, says PM

“People should shop, and shop with confidence” when non-essential stores reopen in England on Monday, Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said.

Mr Johnson said retail staff were “excited” and had done “a huge amount of work” to allow for safer shopping.

But he said people must continue to respect social distancing measures.

It comes as a further 36 deaths from coronavirus were announced in the past 24 hours. It brings the UK death toll – across all settings – to 41,698.

The latest daily figure is the lowest since before lockdown began on 23 March, but there tends to be fewer deaths reported at the weekend, because of a reporting lag.

While food shops and pharmacies, as well as other essential retailers including banks and petrol stations, have been open throughout lockdown, non-essential stores, such as book shops and fashion outlets, have been shuttered since 23 March.

The prime minister

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Public health experts ranked 36 American activities based on risk

As more and more states begin phases of reopening, many Americans are now wondering what is safe to do and what should still be avoided to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

“There’s a huge amount of variation from business to business, from area to area, in how much transmission risk there is for resuming economic activity,” Dr. Katherine Baicker, of the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy, told Yahoo Finance’s The Ticker.

An analysis by MLive chose 36 American activities and asked four public health experts to weigh in on the risk of coronavirus exposure for each activity. The experts factored in whether the activity is inside or outside, proximity to others, how long you’d be exposed, the likelihood of compliance, and your personal risk level. 

Bars and large music concerts are the riskiest settings right now. (Graphic: David Foster/Yahoo Finance)

With 1 being the least risky

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A Home Exercise Plan That Really Works

Even regular exercisers can see their workout routines veer off-course when unexpected changes occur. That’s what happened this past spring when millions of Americans were under stay-at-home orders due to the corona­virus pandemic.

Fitness centers closed, and walking outdoors was more difficult because of concerns about being around too many people.

But it’s still important to stay active. “The older you are, the more quickly you lose physical fitness,” says LaVona Traywick, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the department of occupational therapy at the University of Central Arkansas. “Deconditioning can start in as little as one week.”

In addition to the many proven health benefits of working out, exercise can help your immune system work better, too.

Though it might take time to get used to working out in your living room, shifting to an at-home exercise routine isn’t difficult. Online classes and connected exercise equipment, such as stationary bikes

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This wheelchair user with cerebral palsy just qualified as a gym instructor and says there are no barriers to fitness

Jay Moir is a fitness instructor with cerebral palsy.
Jay Moir is a fitness instructor with cerebral palsy.

Jay Moir

  • Jay Moir is a 20-year-old fitness instructor based in Aberdeen, Scotland.

  • He is also a wheelchair user with cerebral palsy, but won’t let that be a barrier to achieving his goals.

  • Moir struggled with his mental health as a teenager, dropping out of school and gaining weight, but said fitness “gave him his life back,” and he also lost 70 pounds.

  • He trains six days a week and told Insider that able-bodied people in the gym often underestimate his strength.

  • “In the gym, I feel strong and powerful but most importantly, happy!” he said.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The fitness industry can be very intimidating.

Whether it’s the weights room of a gym, a trendy spin studio, or even a Zoom workout class, many workout environments can put people off, which stops them from getting active.

One

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Reopening California schools is dangerous. But so is letting kids go a year without learning

Sean Brandlin, an eighth grade social studies teacher at El Segundo Middle School, stands in his classroom. <span class="copyright">(Los Angeles Times)</span>
Sean Brandlin, an eighth grade social studies teacher at El Segundo Middle School, stands in his classroom. (Los Angeles Times)

With COVID-19 cases at very low levels within its borders, Israel fully reopened its schools in mid-May. By the end of the month, 130 students at a Jerusalem high school had tested positive for the virus, setting off a flurry of quarantines for people who’d had physical contact with the students and the closure of dozens of schools.

This is the kind of outcome American parents dread as they contemplate sending their children back to school sometime this summer or fall.

It’s a troubling scenario, but so is the remote-learning experience of the past three months. The reality is, more kids will do better if schools reopen than if they continue online-only classes. But regardless of how we proceed, we must do better.

With little direction or help from federal

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The Price Of Protesting During Coronavirus: More Spikes Feared

ACROSS AMERICA — At the crossroads of the coronavirus pandemic and civil dissent, some epidemiologists warn that virus infection rates could further spike in the coming days. Their concern has risen about two weeks after Americans began packing city avenues and town streets to protest the Memorial Day death of George Floyd beneath the knee of a Minneapolis police officer.

The protests over threats to black Americans seemed to make many people forget the country is still in the throes of a pandemic. Now, one of the results of the protests may be a stark and deadly reminder that the coronavirus isn’t yet finished with America.

Nearly half of U.S. states saw increases in new coronavirus cases. In a dozen of them, the spikes were alarming. In four states — Arizona, Arkansas, Oregon and Utah — cases more than doubled in a two-week period.

Demonstrations are, by definition, a show

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