Tulsa

Tulsa City Health Official Says Trump Rally ‘Likely Contributed’ to Surge of New Coronavirus Cases

Tulsa City-County Health Department Director Dr. Bruce Dart says President Donald Trump’s campaign rally in Tulsa in late June “likely contributed” to the new surge of coronavirus cases in the area.

On Wednesday, Dart told the Associated Press that the large gathering “more than likely” contributed to the spike, as it drew in thousands of participants — and protesters.

“In the past few days, we’ve seen almost 500 new cases, and we had several large events just over two weeks ago, so I guess we just connect the dots,” Dart said.

Tulsa County reported 261 confirmed new cases on Monday, a one-day record high for the area. On Tuesday it reported another 206 cases. In the week leading up the rally, which took place on Saturday, June 20, the county only reported 76 cases on Monday and 96 on Tuesday, per the department’s database. 

As of Thursday afternoon, July 9,

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How TikTok teens trolled the Trump campaign ahead of Tulsa rally

Users on the social media app TikTok are claiming some credit for the disappointing turnout at the president’s rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, over the weekend, after a weeks-long campaign to artificially inflate the number of people registered to attend. The prank may have helped lead the Trump campaign to boast about more than a million people seeking tickets for the rally — while only about 6,200 ended up filling seats.

In the weeks leading up to the rally, TikTok users started spreading the idea of registering for free tickets with no intention of going — in hopes that they would take seats away from Trump supporters, and leave the president speaking to a hollowed-out stadium.

One of the most prominent posts about the prank came from 51-year-old Mary Jo Laupp, an Iowa woman who worked on Pete Buttigieg’s presidential campaign.

“I recommend that all of us who want to

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Trump in Tulsa Demonstrates Show of Force Against Dihydrogen Monoxide

Photo credit: MANDEL NGAN - Getty Images
Photo credit: MANDEL NGAN – Getty Images

From ELLE

Photo credit: .
Photo credit: .

In Tulsa, Oklahoma on Saturday, in front of a half-empty stadium, Donald Trump drank a glass of water and deeply owned everyone. They said it couldn’t be done in four years and he did it in three and a half, folks. Despite the fact that he claims to not have time to read Twitter, Trump responded to a trend of ableist online derision about the way he drinks water not by critiquing it for its scattershot pettiness, but by accepting it on its merits.

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how K-pop fans trolled Trump in Tulsa

K-pop band BTS performing on Jimmy Kimmel to adoring fans - GC Images
K-pop band BTS performing on Jimmy Kimmel to adoring fans – GC Images

The K-pop community on Twitter and other social media platforms seemed oddly silent in the last few weeks. Usually fervently chatting about their favourite pop idols in public, they were instead talking about Donald Trump. They had honed in on the fact that the US president, campaigning for re-election, would be hosting his first set piece event of the 2020 campaign in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and they had a plan to spoil it.

Lovers of South Korean pop music, also known as K-pop, have claimed the scalp of the most powerful man in the world, taking partial credit for poor attendance at a presidential campaign rally held in Tulsa, Oklahoma, over the weekend. It was the worst-kept secret: despite seemingly every teenager knowing about the plan worldwide, the Trump campaign seemed oblivious to what was going on, boastfully

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Trump’s Campaign Faces Reckoning After Falling Short in Tulsa

(Bloomberg) — President Donald Trump had looked to his first rally in three months as a reset for his campaign. Instead, the sparsely attended event in Tulsa, Oklahoma is stirring fresh questions about both his strategy and the direction of his re-election bid.

The most evident shortfall from Saturday’s rally was attendance, far smaller than the overflow crowd that the president and campaign officials had promised. Yet, more significantly, in his return to the rally stage Trump struggled to escape the coronavirus pandemic and protests over police brutality, crises that are making it harder for him to focus his arguments on his Democratic opponent Joe Biden.

With the president trailing Biden in national polls and reeling from having failed to deliver his Tulsa rally as promised, the Trump campaign will face new pressure to deliver the boost needed to get his bid for a second term back on track. Trump

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10 mind-boggling and unhinged moments from Trump’s Tulsa rally

10 mind-boggling and unhinged moments from Trump's Tulsa rally
10 mind-boggling and unhinged moments from Trump’s Tulsa rally

Donald Trump’s first 2020 campaign rally in Tulsa, Okla. was jam-packed with a slew of confusing, cringe-worthy moments.

For those who didn’t watch live, the rally took place on Saturday night at the city’s Bank of Oklahoma Center. It’s also worth noting that it was held in the middle of a global pandemic, against the advice of medical professionals.

The president and attendees didn’t seem to be fazed by the threat of COVID-19, though. Social distancing was not strictly enforced in the arena, and few people were seen wearing masks – including Trump. But if you thought the lack of concern over health and safety would be the only newsworthy revelation to come out of this event, you’re wrong.

From rows and rows of empty seats, to careless comments about the coronavirus, Confederate monuments, protesters, and more, here are 10 of

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Trump Admits at Smaller-Than-Billed Tulsa Rally He Slowed Coronavirus Testing to Hide Scope of U.S. Spread

President Donald Trump returned to the campaign trail on Saturday to his supporters gathered at a rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, amid the coronavirus pandemic and the nationwide protests occurring across the country in the wake of George Floyd’s death.

Trump’s rally was held at the Bank of Oklahoma Center, which seats a total of 19,000 guests. Though Trump, 74, anticipated a packed audience, the upper decks of the arena remained empty.

And less than two hours before the rally, Trump and Vice President Mike Pence were expected to make remarks to the overflow crowd outside the arena. However, after supporters did not gather in the outdoor areas, plans to address the overflow crowd were canceled.

Before entering, rally attendees reportedly had the option to have their temperatures checked and be given masks and hand sanitizer for the large indoor event. Inside the event, many did not appear to be wearing

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The Tulsa arena that’s hosting Trump’s rally is asking the campaign for its plan to keep people safe from the coronavirus because they still haven’t received one 2 days before the event

President Donald Trump addressing a campaign rally on October 10, 2019, in Minneapolis.
President Donald Trump addressing a campaign rally on October 10, 2019, in Minneapolis.

AP Photo/Jim Mone

  • President Donald Trump is scheduled to take the stage at the BOK Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on Saturday night for his first campaign rally since the coronavirus pandemic shut down most of the US.

  • To sign up for the rally online, prospective attendees must accept a warning about the novel coronavirus that absolves the Trump campaign and the venue of responsibility for “illness or injury.”

  • A spokeswoman for the BOK Center didn’t say whether employees would sign such a waiver, and told Business Insider on Thursday that the Trump campaign still hasn’t sent them a “written plan detailing the steps the event will institute for health and safety, including those related to social distancing.”

  • Experts worry the indoor rally, where thousands of people are expected to be in close contact for hours, is the

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The Trump campaign is making Tulsa rally-goers sign a waiver saying they won’t sue if they get the coronavirus but won’t say whether event staff will have to do the same

President Donald Trump addressing a campaign rally on October 10, 2019, in Minneapolis.
President Donald Trump addressing a campaign rally on October 10, 2019, in Minneapolis.

AP Photo/Jim Mone

  • President Donald Trump is scheduled to take the stage at the BOK Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on Saturday night for his first campaign rally since the coronavirus pandemic shut down most of the US.

  • To sign up for the rally online, prospective attendees must accept a warning about the novel coronavirus that absolves the Trump campaign and the venue of responsibility for “illness or injury.”

  • A spokeswoman for the BOK Center didn’t say whether employees would sign such a waiver and wouldn’t give further information on which precautions were being taken to prevent the spread among event staff members and security.

  • She couldn’t say how many employees would work the event but told Business Insider that vendors and concession stands would be open Saturday.

  • On Wednesday, the state of Oklahoma reported its highest single-day

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